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District Dispatch: Register your DMCA agent by December 2017

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 14:00

TheDigital Millennial Copyright Act instituted the “notice and takedown” rule to protect online service providers — in our case, libraries, universities and schools — who provide public access computers from infringement by third parties if online service providers supply the name and contact information of a designated agent to receive claims of copyright infringement. For more details on this law and regulation see: copyright.gov/dmca-directory

The U.S. Copyright Office asks that online service providers register or re-register an agent to create an up-to-date online directory of agents that rights holders can contact. Libraries and educational institutions who provide open access computers and/or wifi should designate a person who will receive these notices. This person may be the head of the school district, director of the library, personnel from the IT department, legal counsel or other designated staff.

The registration process is straightforward and must be done to benefit from the safe harbor established in Section 512 of the copyright law.

Complete a registration form at dmca.copyright.gov/osp/login.html and provide contact information. Maintain the currency and accuracy of the information, updating it as necessary. Pay a $6 dollar fee.

Registrations must be submitted by December 31, 2017. A new registration process will open every three years.

More Resources

The post Register your DMCA agent by December 2017 appeared first on District Dispatch.

Islandora: Two Community Surveys

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 13:01

There are a couple of matters in the Islandora community that need your feedback through a short survey:

Slack for Islandora

The Islandora Roadmap Committee recently took up a discussion about whether the Islandora community might benefit from having a Slack channel, run by the Islandora Foundation and making use of their free licensing for non-profits. There are a lot of technical details to work out (hosting, maintenance, logging, etc), but before we delve into those, we thought it would be best to start off by surveying the community to see if there's interest in having a Slack channel at all.

Currently we use irc, Skype, Google Hangouts, and FreeConferenceCallHD for voice and text chatting. Slack could be an additional option, or we could try to move meetings from the existing options over to Slack, depending entirely on what the community prefers.

Please let us know if you're interested in having Slack as a channel for the Islandora community by answering this three-question survey. You can also write out your pinions in more details in this listserv discussion.

Support for PHP <5.6

This three-question survey is to capture data about Islandora community needs for PHP version support, without asking people to expose their install details in public. Responses are anonymous. 

Why we're doing this:

Under new versions of PHPUnit 6 all of our tests are failing because they started to use namespaced PHP classes. The older version of PHPUnit 5.7 has a compatibility layer with PHPUnit 6, so we can update our tests to use namespaces and run them on PHPUnit 5 & 6. However PHPUnit 5 only supports PHP 5.6+ and PHPUnit 6 only supports PHP 7+. This means that currently we are using PHPUnit 4 for our tests with PHP 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5. So if we want to update to namespaced test classes we need to travis testing of PHP 5.3, 5.4 and 5.5. 

PHP 5.6, 7.0 and 7.1 are the only officially Zend supported versions of PHP right now: http://php.net/supported-versions.php 

We only use PHPUnit tests in the 7.x version of Islandora in Tuque and Islandora Scholar. Jonathan Green made these pull requests to propose that we only test with 5.6, 7.0 and 7.1 in our tests that rely on PHPUnit: 
https://github.com/Islandora/islandora_scholar/pull/261 
https://github.com/Islandora/tuque/pull/155 

If you want to give a more detailed opinion, there is further discussion taking place on the listserv here.

Thank you for your feedback!

Access Conference: Sponsor Access 2017!

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 11:00

Access sponsors play a big part in keeping the conference affordable and fun. There is still plenty of time to get in on the action for Access 2017 in Saskatoon. If your organization is interested in helping make Access a success check out the sponsorship opportunities page for all of the information you need. You could help fund an awesome social event, the hackathon, a critical coffee break, or pitch something to us!

Our sponsorship levels of recognition are: Adamantium($2500 +)
  • recognition of your participation in all Access conference marketing
  • logo prominently featured on Access homepage and sponsorship banner
  • mention by the conference chair in opening and closing remarks
  • highest rotation in sponsor slideshow displayed between sessions
Gold ($1500)
  • recognition of your participation in all Access conference marketing
  • logo featured on Access homepage
  • mention by the conference chair in opening and closing remarks
  • high rotation in sponsor slideshow displayed between sessions
Silver ($1000)

  • recognition of your participation in all Access conference marketing
  • logo featured on Access Sponsors web page
  • high rotation sponsor slideshow displayed between sessions
Bronze ($500)

  • recognition of your participation in all Access conference marketing
  • logo featured on Access Sponsors web page
  • inclusion in sponsor slideshow displayed between sessions
Pewter ($250)
  • recognition of your participation in all Access conference marketing
  • logo featured on Access Sponsors web page

 

If you are interested in sponsoring Access 2017, please send an email to accesslibcon@gmail.com with the following information:

  • name of organization
  • name of contact person
  • email address of contact person
  • amount of support
  • targeted sponsorship opportunity(ies) of interest, as applicable

Open Knowledge Foundation: Open Knowledge Philippines and Mapua students celebrates Open Data Day 2017

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 07:36

This blog is part of the event report series on International Open Data Day 2017. On Saturday 4 March, groups from around the world organised over 300 events to celebrate, promote and spread the use of open data. 44 events received additional support through the Open Knowledge International mini-grants scheme, funded by SPARC, the Open Contracting Program of Hivos, Article 19, Hewlett Foundation and the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office. This event was supported through the mini-grants scheme under the Human Rights theme.

The Open Knowledge local group in the Philippines co-organised International Open Data Day 2017 with the student council of Mapua Institute of Technology, Makati Campus. 

Joseph De Guia (left), Local ambassador of Open Knowledge Philippines with the Mapua SOIT Student Council officers who co-organized the International Open Data Day 2017

The program was attended by invited speakers, special guests, the local tech community as well as student groups on campus. The program was divided into two sessions: the morning session was on open data awareness while the afternoon session was an open data workshop. The event was attended by close to 200 participants.

Event registration

Creating awareness about Open Data in the Philippines

The session was opened with a welcome and opening remark from Mr Joseph De Guia (local group ambassador of Open Knowledge Philippines) on the theme of the celebration: “Solving problems in the society”. Participants were then showed two videos:  open data from Open Knowledge International and the School of Data Summer Camp to introduce them to the people working behind the scenes at Open Knowledge International and their advocacy work in “showing the value of open data for the work of civil society; how effectively use open data; and making government information systems responsive to civil society.”

Dr Lagmay presenting the portal of Project NOAH

The keynote speaker was Dr Alfredo Mahar Lagmay, Executive Director of the National Operational Assessment of Hazards (Project NOAH) of University of the Philippines. He delivered the message “the use of open data to make disaster resilient Philippines” through the use of Project NOAH. The project has been made available to the public and has encouraged participative and collaborative effort through crowdsourcing and mapping to improve the emergency response during calamities and disasters.

Ms. Stepahine Azarias of Open Data Philippines team – DICT, DOST-iGovPhil during her talk.

The next speaker was Ms Stephanie Azarias, team lead of Open Data Philippines of the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT). Ms Azarias highlighted the harmonisation of government data disclosure through open data and freedom of information (FOI). She presented the open data portal, freedom of information portal and the projects of Integrated Government Philippines Project (iGovPhil).

Ms Gemma Mendoza of Rappler.com during her talk about social activism and using open data in journalism and reporting for social good.

Other speakers were Paul De Paula of Drupal Pilipinas, Ms Gemma Mendoza of Rappler.com. The speakers shared their common interest in open data as well as what they’re doing in this area. Drupal Pilipinas Tech Community volunteers are advocating open source application development for Drupal that can be used in open data portal (such as DKAN). Rappler.com is an online media company who is also doing research and investigative journalism for social good. These speakers brought new ideas on how open data can be explored and used to solve problems in the society.

 

Open Data Workshop

Part of the afternoon session was an opportunity for the students to be engaged in an open data workshop. The students were provided with a brief background about the open data sets to be used in the Project NOAH weather and disaster monitoring.

Joseph leading and facilitating the discussion during the “open data workshop.”

They were guided in downloading the datasets from the Open Data portal and using the FOI data portal. They were also encouraged to formulate their research agenda as their capstone topics. This was followed by a “show and tell” which is a short demonstration of their understanding of the program and discussion of the topics.

Learnings!

The speakers were given the opportunity to encourage students to take steps in open data movement and activism. They were also able to inspire the students, faculty members and other attendees of the event to take part in the open data education and use them to solve the problems in the society. The speakers were awarded a certificate of appreciation at the end of the event.

Awarding a token of appreciation to Dr Lagmay

According to a student participant:

The open data day celebration was a great avenue to learn the value of open data and the tools being used to solve problems in the society, such as disaster assessment through crowdsourcing and mapping, developing an open data portal, data journalism and a lot more.

The Open Knowledge Philippines team is happy to have helped organise the open data day celebration and appreciative of the opportunity to show participants the value data can make in information systems and in effect help facilitate and solve problems in the society. We also had the chance to introduce participants to projects that are effectively using open data through the work of civil societies to push for better services from the government.

The stickers, program and poster prints were sponsored by Open Knowledge International. The swags were provided by DOST-DICT iGovPhil Project and Open Data team. The snacks and lunch provided by the organiser – Open Knowledge Philippines.

The event photos can be viewed on our Facebook community page – https://www.facebook.com/Open-Data-Day-2017 and facebook.com/groups/openknowledgeph, video documentation can be played  here:

The International Open Data Day 2017 was organised by Open Knowledge Philippines and with the help of the Mapua Institute of Technology Student Council, Makati campus. The event was sponsored by Open Knowledge International and supported by Project NOAH, University of the Philippines, Open Data Philippines – DICT and DOST, Drupal Pilipinas, and Rappler.com.

Like and follow us on Facebook Open Knowledge Philippines and on Twitter @OpenKnowledgePH

See you next year for another open data day celebration, and hopefully, we will be much better and present innovative solutions and create impact through open data!

LibUX: Listen: Andy Priestner (29:17)

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 04:35

Andy Priestner (@andytraining) is a global trainer and consultant on user experience, leadership, social media, and LEGO Serious Play. He’s the originator and chair of UXLibs, among many things a best-in-show UX conference, as well as the title of the book he edited with Matt Borg. 

In this episode, we were able to wrangle our timezones and chat about the upcoming conference, as well as Futurelib — an open innovation program exploring the future role of academic libraries within the University of Cambridge through ethnographic studies — and, really, what prompted Andy to resign.

  • 4:00 – About the “team challenge” at UXLibs, plus shout-outs to Ned Potter, Matt Borg, and Donna Lanclos.
  • 9:04 – The state of user experience design in these institutions
  • 11:55 – What happened with Futurelib
  • 18:02 – Andy on leaving his job and going freelance
  • 20:48 – The Tracker Project: eye-tracking people in libraries with glasses

You can also  download the MP3 or subscribe to Metric: A UX Podcast on OverCastStitcher, iTunes, YouTube, Soundcloud, Google Music, or just plug our feed straight into your podcatcher of choice.

DuraSpace News: REGISTER for OR2017–Take Advantage of Early Bird Registration 'til April 21

planet code4lib - Mon, 2017-04-10 00:00

From the organizers of the International Conference on Open Repositories

Karen G. Schneider: MPOW in the here and now

planet code4lib - Sun, 2017-04-09 17:04

Sometimes we have monsters and UFOs, but for the most part it’s a great place to work

I have coined a few biblioneologisms in my day, but the one that has had the longest legs is MPOW (My Place of Work), a convenient, mildly-masking shorthand for one’s institution. For the last four years I haven’t had the bandwidth to coin neologisms, let alone write about MPOW*.

This silence could be misconstrued. I love what I do, and I love where I am. I work with a great team on a beautiful campus for a university that is undergoing a lot of good change. We are just wrapping up the first phase of a visioning project to help our large, well-lit building serve its communities well for the decades to come. We’re getting ready to join the other 22 CSU libraries on OneSearch, our first-ever unified library management system. We have brought on some great hires, thrown some great events (the last one featured four Black Panthers talking about their life work — wow!). With a new dean (me) and a changing workforce, we are developing our own personality.

It’s all good… and getting better

The Library was doing well when I arrived, so my job was to revitalize and switch it up. As noted in one of the few posts about MPOW, the libraries in my system were undergoing their own reassessment, and that has absorbed a fair amount of our attention, but we continue to move forward.

Sometimes it’s the little things. You may recall I am unreasonably proud of the automated table of contents I generated for my dissertation, and I also feel that way about MPOW’s slatwall book displays, which in ten areas beautifully market new materials in spaces once occupied by prison-industry bookcases or ugly carpet and unused phones (what were the phones for? Perhaps we will never know).

The slatwall was a small project that was a combination of expertise I brought from other libraries, good teamwork at MPOW, and knowing folks. The central problem was answered quickly by an email to a colleague in my doctoral program (hi, Cindy!) who manages public libraries where I saw the displays I thought would be a good fit. The team selected the locations, a staff member with an eye for design recommended the color, everyone loves it, and the books fly off the shelves. If there is any complaining, it is that we need more slatwall.

Installed slatwall needs to wait until we know if we are moving/removing walls as part of our building improvements. A bigger holdup is that we need to hire an Access Services Manager, and really, anything related to collections needs the insight of a collections librarian.

People… who need people…

But we had failed searches for both these positions… in the case of collections, twice. *cue mournful music* We have filled other positions with great people now doing great things, and are on track to fill more positions, but these two, replacing people who have retired, are frustrating us. The access services position is a managerial role, and the collections librarian is a tenure-track position. Both offer a lot of opportunity.

We are relaunching both searches very soon (I’ll post a brief update when that happens), and here’s my pitch. If you think you might qualify for either position, please apply. Give yourself the benefit of the doubt. If you know someone who would be a good fit for either position, ask them to apply.

I recently mentored someone who was worried about applying to a position. “Will that library hold it against me if I am not qualified?” The answer is of course not!  (And if they do, well, you dodged that bullet!) I have watched far too many people self-select out of positions they were qualified for (hrrrrmmmm particularly one gender…). Qualification means expertise + capacity + potential. We expect this to be a bit of a stretch to you. If a job is really good, most days will have a “fake it til you make it” quality.

This is also not a “sink or swim” institution. If it ever was, those days are in the dim past, long before I arrived. The climate is positive. People do great things and we do our best to support them. I see our collective responsibility as an organization as to help one another succeed.

Never mind me and my preoccupation with slatwall (think of it as something to keep the dean busy and happy, like a baby with a binky). We are a great team, a great library, on a great campus, and we’re a change-friendly group with a minimum of organizational issues, and I mean it. I have worked enough places to put my hand on a Bible and swear to that. It has typical organizational challenges, and it’s a work in progress… as are we all. The area is crazily expensive, but it’s also really beautiful and so convenient for any lifestyle. You like city? We got city. You like suburb, or ocean, or mountain, or lake? We got that!

Anyway, that’s where I am with MPOW: I’m happy enough, and confident enough, to use this blog post to BEG YOU OH PLEASE HELP US FILL THESE POSITIONS. The people who join us will be glad you did.

###

*   Sidebar: the real hilarity of coining neologisms is that quite often someone, generally of a gender I do not identify with, will heatedly object to the term, as happened in 2004 when I coined the term biblioblogosphere. Then, as I noted in that post from 2012, others will defend it. That leads me to believe that creating new words is the linguistic version of lifting one’s hind leg on a tree.

Bookmark to:

Evergreen ILS: It is Saturday!

planet code4lib - Sat, 2017-04-08 16:04

It is the fifth and final day of the Evergreen International Conference 2017! After five wonderful and exhausting days we’ve covered so much in presentations and side conversations, eaten a lot of food and played a good few games. Our heads are stuffed full of information, friendships renewed and code planned.

We would like to extend thanks to Unique Management (http://www.unique-mgmt.com) for sponsoring this morning’s breakfast. Especially, the bacon. Thank you to the conference committee and the local volunteers, you were all wonderful and your committing your time and passion are a testament to our community’s strength. Thank you to everyone for coming and every presenter. See you next year in St. Charles!

Ed Summers: MITH Graphs

planet code4lib - Sat, 2017-04-08 04:00

For the next few weeks I’m helping out in Matt Kirschenbaum’s Critical Topics in Digital Studies where we will be taking a look at network analysis in the humanities. The plan is to provide a gentle introduction to the use of network analysis, aka graphs, in the digital humanities, while providing the students with some hands on experience using some tools.

Thanks to a conversation with Miriam Posner, Thomas Padilla and Scott Weingart a few weeks ago I got some ideas for how this could work. Specifically Miriam’s idea of having the students assemble edge lists for networks that are relevant to them in Google Sheets, and then using Google Fusion tables to do some basic visualization followed by some more analysis and tuning of the visualization with Cytoscape. Miriam’s Cytoscape Tutorials are so lucid and useful I’m planning to just use them directly. I really appreciate that she took the time to make them available for use by other people.

So I wanted to create my own little demonstration dataset similar to how Miriam used films to learn my way around Fusion Tables and Cytoscape. Over a year ago MITH made its Research Explorer available, which is a small app that allows people to browse research projects from the last 10 years by sponsor, topic and time. One nice side effect of putting the JavaScript application together is that the project information that has been curated in Wordpress is also available as a single file of JSON.

So without too much work it’s possible to download that JSON file and then turn it into an edge list CSV file where column 1 is a project and column 2 is a person who was involved in the project. Then you can load it into Google Fusion Tables and with two clicks you are looking at a graph of that data:

It’s a little bit interesting, and it’s nice you can manipulate the graph … but it’s kind of a mess really. One thing that Miriam suggested doing is taking the two-mode graph (there are two types of nodes here: people and projects) and projecting it as two one-mode graphs: graph 1 would be of people and graph 2 would be of projects. The people graph would be people who were associated because they worked together on the same project. And the graph of projects would have projects linked together because similar people worked on them. Here’s what they look like:

As you can see they are much more interesting. The people one in particular shows MITH’s Director Neil Fraistat at the center. Also our designer Kirsten Keister who has been in MITH for a while, has worked with many different people over the years.

Miriam had the students use R to do this projection, using a small helper function that Matt Lincoln wrote. But I’ve been meaning to learn more about Python’s igraph so I took it as opportunity to learn how to do it. It’s not as elegant’s as Matt’s code, but it works. I think I may turn it into a little microservice so the students can just use the browser to do the transformation.

The next step for the class is going to show how to take the same edge list and load it into Cytoscape where the graph can be manipulated a bit more. Specifically it’s possible to use the number of times people collaborated together as edge weights, and then to use that weight to change the appearance of the edge. In this example I used the weight to make the edge thicker:



It’s not really very legible here, but in Cytoscape it’s easy to zoom in and see that there was a cohort of people who did lots of work together: Trevor, Kirsten, Jen, Amanda, Travis and Neil. You can also see bridging people like Ben Schneiderman who brought in people from outside of MITH’s usual collaborators. If you are interested and have Cytoscape you can find the cys file here.

Ed Summers: MITH Graphs

planet code4lib - Sat, 2017-04-08 04:00

For the next few weeks I’m helping out in Matt Kirschenbaum’s Critical Topics in Digital Studies where we will be taking a look at network analysis in the humanities. The plan is to provide a gentle introduction to the use of network analysis, aka graphs, in the digital humanities, while also creating a space to give the students some hands on experience using some tools. These working sessions are paired with discussions of a bunch of fun readings about algorithms, networks and platforms by Tressie McMillan Cottom, Benjamin Schmidt, Tarleton Gillespie, Jen Golbeck, Zeynep Tufekci, Nick Diakopoulos, Frank Pasquale as well as Alex Galloway & Eugene Thacker.

Thanks to a conversation with Miriam Posner, Thomas Padilla and Scott Weingart a few weeks ago I got some ideas for how this could work. Specifically Miriam’s idea of having the students assemble edge lists for networks that are relevant to them in Google Sheets, and then using Google Fusion tables to do some basic visualization followed by some more analysis and tuning of the visualization with Cytoscape. Miriam’s Cytoscape Tutorials are so lucid and useful I’m planning to just use them directly. I really appreciate that she took the time to make them available for use by other people.

So I wanted to create my own little demonstration dataset similar to how Miriam used films to learn my way around Fusion Tables and Cytoscape. Over a year ago MITH made its Research Explorer available, which is a small app that allows people to browse research projects from the last 10 years by sponsor, topic and time. One nice side effect of putting the JavaScript application together is that the project information that has been curated in Wordpress is also available as a single file of JSON.

So without too much work it’s possible to download that JSON file and then turn it into an edge list CSV file where column 1 is a project and column 2 is a person who was involved in the project. Then you can load it into Google Fusion Tables and with two clicks you are looking at a graph of that data:

It’s a little bit interesting, and it’s nice you can manipulate the graph … but it’s kind of a mess really. One thing that Miriam suggested doing is taking the two-mode graph (there are two types of nodes here: people and projects) and projecting it as two one-mode graphs: one of people and the other of projects. The people graph contains people who were associated because they have worked together on the same project. The graph of projects would contain projects linked together because some of the same people worked on them. Here’s what they look like:

As you can see they are much more interesting. The people one in particular shows MITH’s Director Neil Fraistat at the center. Also our designer Kirsten Keister who has been in MITH for a while, has worked with many different people over the years.

Miriam had the students use R to do this projection, using a small helper function that Matt Lincoln wrote. But I’ve been meaning to learn more about Python’s igraph so I took it as opportunity to learn how to do it. It’s not as elegant’s as Matt’s code, but it works. I think I may turn it into a little microservice so the students can just use the browser to do the transformation.

The next step for the class is going to show how to take the same edge list and load it into Cytoscape where the graph can be manipulated a bit more. Specifically it’s possible to use the number of times people collaborated together as edge weights, and to use that weight to change the appearance of the edge. In this example I used the weight to make the edge thicker. I also had Cytoscape analyze the graph which provided each node’s degree or the number of edges for each node. Using Miriam’s notes it’s clear how to adjust the size of the node based on the degree. This has the effect of making more connected nodes larger.



It’s not really very legible here, but in Cytoscape it’s easy to zoom in and see that there was a cohort of people who did lots of work together: Trevor Muñoz, Kirsten Keister, Jennifer Guiliano, Amanda Viscontin, Travis Brown, James Smith and Neil Fraistat. You can also see bridging people like Ben Schneiderman who brought in people from outside of MITH’s usual collaborators. If you are interested and have Cytoscape you can find the cys file here. The nodes colored in yellow were selected because they were all people who had worked directly with Neil.

If you have ideas or comments about any of this I’d enjoy hearing them either here or @edsu.

LITA: Technology Roadmapping: A Tool for Planning

planet code4lib - Fri, 2017-04-07 20:41

As I look towards the end of the semester, I can’t help but think about what’s ahead. It’s time for us to dust off our strategic plan and think about activities for Fall even as the echoes of unfinished projects and initiatives that seemed like a good idea a few months ago still linger. We’ve recently been on a technology shopping spree where we’ve steadily been adding new toys and gadgets to our ever increasing stash of Go Pro’s, 3D printers, HTC Vive, and a myriad of chargers, microphones, and accessories.

We’ve offered both internal and external training, and most of our equipment is well used thanks to our outreach efforts. But there is still the sense that we don’t have a great plan for how to deploy these tools and we deal with requests for assistance on an ad hoc basis at best. In reading about strategic planning for technology, I ran across an interesting model, technology mapping.

According to Marie Garcia and Olin Bray in their paper entitled “Fundamentals of Technology Roadmapping”, technology mapping allows an organization to identify the needs that will drive technology selection and implementation keeping in mind that there is no certain way to predict what the next “hot” area of interest might be but allowing for a flexible and forward-thinking planning process in several iterative and interrelated steps, much like design thinking or similar model.

Phase 1

  • Develop the context for the roadmap which explains why the roadmap is needed and how it will be used
  • Identify the problem that the roadmap can assist in solving as well as potential partners and stakeholders who can help

Phase 2

  • Identify the product, service, or resource that will be the focus of the roadmap and what critical requirements are needed in order to achieve success, whether it be in the form of  hardware, software, personnel, or other area

Phase 3

  • Develop an implementation plan, assess, review, and update as needed

While this process may not seem different than other strategic planning models, a few things strike me as interesting. First, the entire roadmap is based both on user and library needs. Too often I’ve been involved in a process that seems to be very removed from either of these areas and while broader institutional goals are taken into account, it feels like a very unilateral way of dealing with what should be an organic and effective way of determining where the library is headed. This idea of stepping back allows for a (hopefully) accurate snapshot of what problems users are having as well as establishing a frank dialogue about the library’s capacity and willingness to solve them. The library may truly want to address all of the issues that are uncovered, but if there is no staffing or funding to do so, it seems like a pointless venture. Alternatively, this can also open up the discourse with institutional administration so that if a need seems compelling enough from the library perspective and a case is made that it should be resolved, it might be supported exactly because it has been brought to the forefront in a thoughtful manner whereas it might not have been uncovered had this initial needs assessment been conducted.

Second, I also really like the way in which this process forces the discussion about priorities and what specific tool or service will be their focus. I think sometimes we get caught up in buying the latest and the greatest simply to say we have it only to be left wondering how we are going to support it once the excitement is over. But if we cannot articulate how exactly we are going to make this technology successful as part of those larger library and institutional goals, chances are it will become another forgotten fad locked away in a closet for someone to find years later.

Finally, I like the element of the operational merged with that of impact.  I’m guilty of this “we’ll figure it out later” attitude myself, but it’s much more productive to know how you will accomplish your goal from the start rather than piecemeal a solution later down the road. I think this also helps address the question of “what” in a process that is really more focused on the how. In thinking about strategic directions and goals, we’re great at saying we will do x by this time, but the details are very much in question until it comes time to implement that goal and no one truly knows where to start.

Whatever your technology strategic planning process looks like, it’s important to keep in mind that there are other models to try and that technology planning is quite different from its more “traditional” counterpart. Just realizing there is a difference makes, well, a difference and knowing how to structure the process so that it provides a meaningful result can help prevent you and your institution from feeling like you have to have a crystal ball to know what’s coming up.

 

District Dispatch: “Lead-off” advocacy home run ignites FY 2018 library funding rally!

planet code4lib - Fri, 2017-04-07 15:57

If you’ve been to this page in the last few weeks, you know that the President has proposed wiping out all library funding – and the agency that administers much of it (IMLS) – in his initial FY 2018 budget proposal. You also know that thousands of librarians, library supporters, users, vendors and just plain folk in literally every Congressional district in the country used the ALA Legislative Action Center and many other channels to insist that their Representative in the House sign two “Dear Appropriator” letters to the Appropriations Committee asking them to preserve funding this year for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy program.

Well, you hit it out of the park at our first at bat of the FY 2018 appropriations lobbying season. One-third of the entire House of Representatives, from both parties, signed each of those Dear Appropriator letters and nearly 170 Members signed at least one! That’s a nearly 18% increase in support for IAL and a record-shattering 64% increase for LSTA! Now we’ve absolutely got to keep the rally you started going … and going … and going all through this calendar year. But, just like in baseball, it’s one at bat and one inning at a time. And if we’re lucky we’ll even get a welcome seventh inning stretch this summer!

Source: http://gamerlimit.com/how-to-bet-on-baseball/

Later in April, it’ll be both of your US Senators’ turns to hear how much you want them to save IMLS and to keep the budget axe well away from LSTA and IAL funding for FY 2018. While our champions in the Senate warm up before delivering their own Dear Appropriator pitches, however, you can help load the bases now by driving this line to your Member of the House and both your Senators: “Please save IMLS and fight for full FY 2018 LSTA and IAL funding this year.”

Please, click now and then stay loose while keeping an ear out here for a loud “batter up!” That’ll be the signal to knock our Senate LSTA and IAL Dear Appropriator letter signature totals out of the park . . . again. Check this Senate tracker to see if your Senator signed last year and stay tuned for updates on who is signing this year.

The post “Lead-off” advocacy home run ignites FY 2018 library funding rally! appeared first on District Dispatch.

Open Knowledge Foundation: Open Data Day 2017: Celebrating data use and openness

planet code4lib - Fri, 2017-04-07 13:20

This blog is part of the event report series on International Open Data Day 2017. On Saturday 4 March, groups from around the world organised over 300 events to celebrate, promote and spread the use of open data. 44 events received additional support through the Open Knowledge International mini-grants scheme, funded by SPARC, the Open Contracting Program of Hivos, Article 19, Hewlett Foundation and the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office. This event was supported through the mini-grants scheme under the Open contracting and tracking public money flows theme.

This blog has been reposted from http://socialtic.org/post/158716923448/open-data-day-2017-celebrating-data-use-and – the Spanish version is available at http://socialtic.org/post/158170113108/open-data-day-2017-fiesta-datera-por-la-apertura

Open Data Day is an international celebration where simultaneous activities are organised by data communities around the world to learn about open data, liberate closed data, showcase data-driven projects and promote multi-disciplinary collaboration.

Latin America celebrated open data in many cities this year. Here you can see all the events, from Argentina to Northern Mexico, that ran throughout the region.

In Mexico City, Open Data Day has become over the years an event that brings together different communities that no data user or enthusiasts want to miss. You can have a look at our previous open data day events: 2014, 2015, 2016.

How was ODD17 celebrated in Mexico City?

This year, nearly 180 people gathered for an entire day of activities, good food and craft beer. Participants had the opportunity to experience the following:

  • 8 workshops on different data user skills
  • Public Spending Rally
  • Showcase of 9 amazing projects
Workshops for Intro and Pro data users

The workshops were divided into introductory and professional tracks so that everyone had a chance to learn. The topics included: statistics for data analysis, data cleaning using Open Refine, data architecture for network analysis, open contracting, big data analysis using cloud-based services, analog visualisation and data visualisation with D3.

Presentations:

  1. Open Contracting – Katherine Wikrent (Open Contracting) and Rafael García (Transparencia Mexicana)
  2. Statistics and Machine Learning – Jesús Ramos (The DataPub –  Datank)
  3. Data Cleaning with Open Refine – Armando Monsivais (Estrategia Digital Nacional)

Workshop videos, recorded and streamed by Software Gurú:

  1. Big data analysis using cloud-based services – Paco Mekler (OPI)
  2. Statistics and Machine Learning – Jesús Ramos (DataPub + Datank)
  3. Visualisation using D3 – Irving Morales (Morlan)

Data projects at Open Data Day 2017
  1. Testigo Social 2.0 (Social Witness) – Transparencia MexicanaTestigo social 2.0 is a citizen participation and transparency platform based on open contracting. This was presented by Rafael García
  2. Puebla Bajo Amenaza (Puebla Under Threat) – LadoBAranzazú Ayala, journalist from a local digital journalist portal, Lado B, shared how the project  “Puebla bajo amenaza” analysed insecurity and crime data of the state of Puebla.
  3. Desplazamiento forzado (Forced Displacement)  – Animal Político. Journalistic investigation on forced displacement in Mexico that highlights the regions most affected, the data behind the phenomena and stories on the affected communities. Presented by Paris Martínez
  4. Datos.gob.mx: plataforma y casos de uso – CEDN (open data platform and user cases). Enrique Zapata from the platform Datos.gob.mx shared the strategy behind the data opening of the Mexico government.
  5. OISE, Data Coral and Observatrump.mx – Smart Data IntelligenceMarcel Julien introduced a combo of 3 projects with diverse data content. OISE is an observatory of the Mexican Energy Industry; Data Coral monitors coral biodiversity and Observa Trump, aggregates all media and social media on Donald Trump.
  6. Datos georeferenciados sobre homicidios y modelo predictivo de crimen (Geo-referenced data about homicides and predictive crime model). Stephane Keil presented a predictive statistics analysis on murder and crime in Mexico City 2015 – 2016.
  7. RuidoCDMX: medición de ruido con tecnología abierta (open tech for noise measurement). RuidoCDMX is an open source project that enables anyone to measure and visualise noise levels.
  8. Mapa del precio de la gasolina (Gas price map) – Gobierno Fácil. The gobierno Fácil team presented an interactive map that visualises gasoline prices at a municipal level in Mexico.
Open Data Rally Awards: #DatosEnLaCalle

For the second year in a row, the Ministry of Finance Budget Transparency team organized a rally so that citizens can use open data to verify the status of public infrastructure projects including their reported expenses. With over 400 participants, the winning teams were:

Thanks for taking data to the streets (#DatosEnLaCalle)!

Thanks to all the data community and friends. Together we celebrate World Open Data Day 2017! :)

 

Evergreen ILS: Friday Conference Thanks!

planet code4lib - Fri, 2017-04-07 13:14

We would like to thank Bibliomation and Midwest Tape for sponsoring our breaks on Friday! And thank you to Backstage Library Works & Overdrive for sponsoring our Lightning Talks.

These are not just sponsors and exhibitors but also part of the community. I hope everyone who is at the conference will stop by the exhibitors and talk to them in the gazebo area!

Evergreen ILS: Evergreen Community Annual Report 2016

planet code4lib - Fri, 2017-04-07 12:06

It is that time again, for the 2016 Evergreen Community Annual Report (released in 2017)! Thank you to everyone who responded to the survey and helped put it together and thank you to the Oversight Board and Outreach Committee for making it come to life. While attendees at the conference this morning can enjoy the printed version of the annual report here is the digital!

High Resolution Copy for Printing Here.

Lower Resolution for Electronic Display Here.

You are welcome to re-distribute the report and print it in part or full.

District Dispatch: Library advocates make the local editorial pages

planet code4lib - Thu, 2017-04-06 20:48

In response to President Trump’s proposed federal budget cuts, library professionals and supporters have sent a clear message to members of Congress and in their local editorial pages (see our previous post on writing letters to the editor). While the proposed elimination of IMLS and deep funding cuts for libraries is not news to us, many (if not most!) people in our communities are ignorant of this potentially devastating and imminent threat to our nation’s libraries.

Image from SequimGazette.com

Library professionals are trusted leaders in their communities as well as experts in the library. It is more important than ever for librarians to use their respected status to influence public opinion on a broader scale. To inspire all of us to speak out in our local media – especially during National Library Week, which kicks off on Sunday – we’re highlighting just a few of the many letters to the editor in support of library funding that have been published over the past couple of weeks:

Proposed budget would hurt libraries,” The Salem (MA) News 
One strength to highlight about this letter, written by Teen and Reference Librarian Anna Tschetter, is her specific reference to how individual citizens will be affected by cuts: “local governments would have to bear the burden of coming up with the funds, or voters would lose access to critical services like job training, early literacy programs, homework help and free access to digital tools that many of us cannot afford at home.” The examples she uses include workforce training and digital tools – both of which are particularly compelling to Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle because of their direct link to the economy. In addition, she issues a call to action by asking her “members of Congress to show their support by ensuring that IMLS is not defunded.”

Support libraries,” The Daily Courier (Prescott, AZ)
Anthony Zades’ letter mentions his members of Congress by name: “I agree with the American Library Association (ALA) who calls this action ‘counterproductive and short-sighted.’ I hope that Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake, as well as Representative Paul Gosar will also agree with the ALA and me.” The fact that he uses their names is significant because communications staff in congressional offices scan news clips for specific mentions of the congressperson’s name – so we can be 95% sure that staff for Rep. Flake and Senators McCain and Flake actually saw Anthony’s letter the very same day it was published. (It’s a plus that Anthony mentions ALA by name as well!)

Voice support for IMLS funding,” The News-Courier (Athens, AL)
Past President of the Alabama Library Association Paula Laurita uses language that gets at the bottom line for budget-conscious members of Congress when she writes that “Libraries… deliver one of the best returns on investment for tax dollars.” In addition, Paula includes a brief yet powerful anecdote that exemplifies this point: “One such person had just left an abusive marriage. She enrolled in her library’s computer classes, resume class, and interview skills class. With her new knowledge she was able to find full-time employment. She was able to leave public assistance and support herself and her children. This wouldn’t have been possible without a grant made possible through IMLS.”

Preserve IMLS,” Moscow-Pullman (WA) Daily News 
In a letter penned by Whitman County Library Director Kristie Kirkpatrick, she demonstrates the success of her library system by including local statistics: “Last year, attendance at Whitman County Library classes and programs reached an all-time high of 39,000.” Kristie’s letter, like Paula’s, appeals to the common sense in local taxpayers’ prioritizing libraries: “You won’t see a better return on your investment than tax support for libraries… IMLS funds stretch our local dollars.”

Keep up the great work, and please let us know if you get published. ALA Washington Office staff often share local media coverage of libraries when they go on Hill visits, and absolutely nothing is more persuasive to members of Congress and their staff than voices from back home. What’s more, you can amplify your own message by sending a link to your published letter in a personal email to your members of Congress.

The post Library advocates make the local editorial pages appeared first on District Dispatch.

District Dispatch: Appropriations webinar announced for National Library Week

planet code4lib - Thu, 2017-04-06 19:06

Appropriations, Budgets, and Continuing Resolutions: what you need to know about the Congressional Appropriations Process

Confused about the $1 trillion Federal Appropriations process? Does talk of the FY 17 budget, FY 18 budget, the President’s “Skinny” budget, Continuing Resolutions and Omnibus budgeting leave you a tad confused? You are not alone!

Aissa Canchola of the Penn Hill Group

To help answer some of these questions, ALA is hosting a webinar on April 13, 2017, 2:30pm eastern to provide an overview of the Federal budget and appropriations process, its impact on libraries throughout the country and the importance of front line advocacy efforts on behalf of libraries.

Join the ALA Washington Office Appropriations expert Kevin Maher and the Penn Hill lobbying group’s Aissa Canchola for an hour-long discussion of the ABCs of the budget process in Washington. These budget experts will help explain how Congress can be working on last year’s budget AND this year’s budget at the same time, what the President’s proposal to eliminate the Institute of Museum and Library Services could mean for more than $213 million in federal library funding and how Congress is expected to proceed in the coming weeks and months.

The stakes are high this year and all federal library funding is on the chopping block after the President effectively proposed eliminating these important programs. Your calls, emails, tweets to Members of the House of Representatives in support of the annual “Dear Appropriator” letters for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program proved highly successful this year, but we’re only at the start of a year-long FY 2018 appropriations. What’s next on the funding front?

You will walk away from this session with a clearer idea of how Congress’ budget and appropriations machine works and, perhaps most importantly, how YOU can get involved in saving critical library funding for LSTA and IAL.

Here is your chance to hear from the experts and ask questions of how it all works (or doesn’t). No registration is required – just join us on YouTube on April 13, 2017 at 2:30pm eastern and use the #SaveIMLS to ask a question.

The post Appropriations webinar announced for National Library Week appeared first on District Dispatch.

FOSS4Lib Recent Releases: VuFind Harvest - 2.3.0

planet code4lib - Thu, 2017-04-06 18:48
Package: VuFind HarvestRelease Date: Thursday, April 6, 2017

Last updated April 6, 2017. Created by Demian Katz on April 6, 2017.
Log in to edit this page.

- Dropped support for PHP 5.4 and 5.5.
- Added new globalSearch / globalReplace parameters.
- Fixed bug: xmlns namespace attributes injected incorrectly.

LITA: LITA Spring 2017 Web Courses

planet code4lib - Thu, 2017-04-06 17:22

We’re excited to announce two new LITA web courses for this spring. You can choose between:

Beginning Git and GitHub
and
Project Management for Success

Register here, courses are listed by date and you need to log in.

Here are the details.

Beginning Git and GitHub
Instructors: Kate Bronstad, Web Developer, Tufts University Libraries; and Heather Klish, Systems Librarian, Tufts University Libraries.
May 4 – June 1, 2017

Work smarter, collaborate faster and share code or other files with the library community using the popular version control system Git. Featuring a mix of git fundamentals and hands-on exercises, participants learn the basics of Git, learn how to use key commands, and how to use GitHub to their advantage, including sharing their own work and building upon the projects of others.

Details here and Registration here.

Project Management for Success
Instructor: Gina Minks, Principal, Gina Minks Consulting, LLC
May 16 – June 6, 2017

A solid background in the fundamentals of project management will increase the success of any project. This course presents the basics of the Project Managment Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) with practical experience to provide the individual with the tools to create a successful project plan. The course is structured as a lecture with hands on components throughout the class with an emphasis on the use of open source technology to manage the project. Class includes a basic introduction to both Trello and Asana.

Details here and Registration here.

These are both blended format web courses:

The courses will be delivered as 4 or 5 separate live webinar lectures, one per week. You do not have to attend the live lectures in order to participate. The webinars will be recorded and distributed through the web course platform, Moodle will be used for asynchronous participation. The web courses space will also contain the exercises and discussions for the course.

And don’t miss the other upcoming LITA continuing education offerings by checking the Online Learning web page.

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org

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