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conferences

You know, when people get together and talk about stuff.

Code4Lib NorCal 28 July in San Mateo

A one-day Code4Lib NorCal Meeting will be held 10am - 3:00pm on 28 July at 777 Mariner's Island Blvd., San Mateo (the building that the OCLC Research San Mateo office is in).

There is no cost, and OCLC will provide attendees lunch. Parking is plentiful and free.

Please see More information on the wiki.

Code4Lib 2015

Code4Lib 2015 will be held at the Hilton Portland & Executive Tower in downtown Portland, OR on Februrary 9 - 12, 2015.

Pre-conferences will be held Monday February 9, and the main conference on February 10 - 12.

Watch this space for further details as they develop, and participate in the planning process by signing up for Conference Committees.

2014 Code of Conduct

Code4Lib seeks to provide a welcoming, fun, and safe community and conference experience and ongoing community for everyone. We do not tolerate harassment in any form. Discriminatory language and imagery
(including sexual) is not appropriate for any event venue, including talks, or any community channel such as the chatroom or mailing list.

Harassment is understood as any behavior that threatens another person or group, or produces an unsafe environment. It includes offensive verbal comments or non-verbal expressions related to gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age, religious beliefs, sexual or discriminatory images in public spaces (including online), deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Conflict Resolution

1. Initial Incident

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please inform the offender that he/she has affected you negatively. Oftentimes, the offending behavior is unintentional, and the accidental offender and offended will resolve the incident by having that initial discussion.

2. Escalation

Code4Lib 2015 Call for Host Proposals

The Code4Lib Community is calling for proposals to host the tenth annual Code4Lib Conference in 2015. Prior to submitting a proposal we recommend reviewing the conference hosting web page and How To Plan a Code4LibCon on the wiki to learn more about the kind of venue the community seeks and the responsibilities involved with hosting the conference.

Topic: 

Code4Lib 2014 Sponsors

Code4Lib 2014 could not be successful without the generous support of our sponsors. We are very thankful to all of our sponsors for helping to defray the costs of the conference and supporting the scholarships we are able to provide to worthy recipients.

Platinum Sponsor:
OCLC
OCLC

2014 Conference Schedule

Schedule for the 2014 Code4Lib Conference in Raleigh, NC.

All Tiled Up

Mike Graves, MIT Libraries

You've got maps. You even scanned and georeferenced them. Now what? Running a full GIS stack can be expensive, and overkill in some cases. The good news is that you have a lot more options now than you did just a few years ago. I'd like to present some lighter weight solutions to making georeferenced images available on the Web.

This talk will provide an introduction to MBTiles. I'll go over what they are, how you create them, how you use them and why you would use them.

Lucene's Latest (for Libraries)

Erik Hatcher, LucidWorks

Lucene powers the search capabilities of practically all library discovery platforms, by way of Solr, etc. The Lucene project evolves rapidly, and it's a full-time job to keep up with the ever improving features and scalability. This talk will distill and showcase the most relevant(!) advancements to date.

Under the Hood of Hadoop Processing at OCLC Research

Roy Tennant, OCLC Research

Apache Hadoop is widely used by Yahoo!, Google, and many others to process massive amounts of data quickly. OCLC Research uses a 40-node compute cluster with Hadoop and HBase to process the 300 million MARC records of WorldCat in various ways. This presentation will explain how Hadoop MapReduce works and illustrate it with specific examples and code. The role of the jobtracker in both monitoring and reporting on processes will be explained. String searching WorldCat will also be demonstrated live.

Queue Programming -- how using job queues can make the Library coding world a better place

Birkin James Diana, Brown University

In 2007 we built a system that dumped certain user web-requests for books into a database for offline-processing triggered via cron. We wanted to make the magic happen live, but knew it would take too long. Thus we created, sort of accidentally, a kind of old-fashioned static procedural job queue.

Over the years we we've been repeatedly impressed with how useful and robust this unintended architecture has been, and it fostered thinking about using real job queues in Library workflows.

Fast-forward to the present. We now are using _real_ job queueing, in production, for parts of the functioning of Brown Digital Repository. We've also used it for ingestion scripts, and plan to move more lots more code to this architecture.

I'd like to share & show:

  • our lightweight rq/redis job queueing setup
  • how using job queues can speed up workflows via using multiple workers
  • how job queueing can make workflows more robust, especially by simplifying failure handling
  • a way we've smoothly avoided race-conditions that can occur in concurrent-programming
  • a technique for using task-processing job queues to simplify complex workflows

rq: http://python-rq.org

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