You are here

code4lib 2014

Organic Free-Range API Development - Making Web Services That You Will Actually Want to Consume

Steve Meyer and Karen Coombs, OCLC

Building web services can have great benefits by providing reusability of data and functionality. Underpinning your applications with a web service will allow you to write code once and support multiple environments: your library's web app, mobile applications, the embedded widget in your campus portal. However, building a web service is its own kind of artful programming. Doing it well requires attention to many of the same techniques and requirements as building web applications, though with different outcomes.

So what are the usability principles for web services? How do you build a web service that you (and others) will actually want to use? In this talk, we’ll share some of the lessons learned - the good, the bad, and the ugly - through OCLC's work on the WorldCat Metadata API. This web service is a sophisticated API that provides external clients with read and write access to WorldCat data. It provides a model to help aspiring API creators navigate the potential complications of crafting a web service. We'll cover:

  • Loose coupling of data assets and resource-oriented data modeling at the core
  • Coding to standards vs. exposure of an internal data model
  • Authentication and security for web services: API Keys, Digital Signing, OAuth Flows

A reusable application to enable self deposit of complex objects into a digital preservation environment

Jill Sexton, Mike Daines, Greg Jansen, UNC Chapel Hill Libraries

Patron-initiated ingest of complex, multi-part objects into digital preservation environments remains a challenging problem for many libraries. In this talk we discuss how we approached this problem at UNC Chapel Hill.

Sustaining your Open Source project through training

Bess Sadler (Stanford University Libraries) and Mark Bussey (Data Curation Experts) will discuss their experiences developing and delivering training for Project Hydra.

Topics covered:

Building for others (and ourselves): the Avalon Media System

Michael B Klein, Senior Software Developer, and Julie Rudder, Digital Initiatives Project Manager, Northwestern University

Dead-simple Video Content Management: Let Your Filesystem Do The Work

Andreas Orphanides, NCSU Libraries

Content management is hard. To keep all the moving parts in order, and to maintain a layer of separation between the system and content creators (who are frequently not technical experts), we typically turn to content management systems like Drupal. But even Drupal and its kin require significant overhead and present a not inconsiderable learning curve for nontechnical users.

In some contexts it's possible -- and desirable -- to manage content in a more streamlined, lightweight way, with a minimum of fuss and technical infrastructure. In this presentation I'll share a simple MVC-like architecture for managing video content for playback on the web, which uses a combination of Apache's mod_rewrite module and your server's filesystem structure to provide an automated approach to video content management that's easy to implement and provides a low barrier to content updates: friendly to content creators and technology implementors alike. Even better, the basic method is HTML5-friendly, and can be integrated into your favorite content management system if you've got permissions for creating templates.

Visualizing Library Resources as Networks

Matt Miller, New York Public Library, NYPL Labs.

Library resources are typically presented linearly in the form of a catalog search results page or an iterative list of subjects, books, special collections, etc. This talk explores the possibilities created when thinking of library resources as interconnected networks. We will look at the progress of a project to visualize NYPL resources such as catalog subject headings[1][2] as a network. We will also look at moving beyond visualizations into building network interfaces, such as our archival access term explorer[3] prototype.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - code4lib 2014