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code4lib 2011

Why (Code4) Libraries Exist - Eric Hellman

Why (Code4) Libraries Exist

  • Eric Hellman, President, Gluejar, Inc., eric@hellman.net

Code4Lib 2011, Thursday 10 February, 11:40 - 12:00

Libraries have historically delivered value to society by facilitating the sharing of books. The library "brand" is built around the building and exploitation of their collections. These collections have been acquired and owned. As ebook readers become the preferred consumption platform for books, libraries are beginning to come to terms with the fact that they don't own their digital collections, and can't share books as they'd like to. Yet libraries continue to be valuable in many ways. In this transitional period, only one thing can save libraries from irrelevance and dissipation: Code.

Sharing Between Data Repositories - Kevin S. Clarke

Sharing Between Data Repositories

  • Kevin S. Clarke, NESCent/Dryad Data Repository, ksclarke@nescent.org

Slides

Code4Lib 2011, Thursday 10 February, 11:20 - 11:40

Dryad is a generic subject repository that shares author submitted data with other scientific repositories. In a part "how we done it" and part "things to consider" talk, I'll discuss 1) why we chose BagIt and OAI-ORE as mechanisms for sharing our data, 2) how we've integrated with TreeBASE -- a subject repository of phylogenetic information), and 3) the possibility of this method of data sharing being adopted by other repositories within the larger DataONE community.

There will be cake.

Practical Relevancy Testing - Naomi Dushay

Practical Relevancy Testing

  • Naomi Dushay, Stanford University Libraries, ndushay@stanford.edu

Slides

Additional Info

Code4Lib 2011, Thursday 10 February, 11:00 - 11:20

Evaluating search result relevancy is difficult for any sizable amount of data, since human vetted ideal search results are essentially non-existent. This is true even for library collections, despite dedicated librarians and their familiarity with the collections. So how can we evaluate if search engine configuration changes (e.g. boosting, field analysis, search analysis settings) are an improvement? How can we ensure the results for query A don’t degrade while we try to improve results for query B? Why yes, Virginia, automatable tests are the answer. This talk will show you how you can easily write these tests from your hidden goldmine of human vetted relevancy rankings.

Mendeley's API and University Libraries: Three Examples to Create Value - Ian Mulvany

Mendeley's API and University Libraries: Three Examples to Create Value

  • Ian Mulvany, Mendeley

Code4Lib 2011, Thursday 10 February, 09:35 - 09:55

Mendeley is a technology startup that is helping to revolutionize the way research is done. Used by more than 600,000 academics and industry researchers, Mendeley enables researchers to arrange collaborative projects, work and discuss in groups, as well as share data across its web platform. Launched in London in December 2008, Mendeley is already the world’s largest research collaboration platform. Through this platform, we anonymously pools users’ research paper collections, creating a crowd-sourced research database with a unique layer of social information - each research paper is connected with socio-demographic information about its audience. Based on this platform and data, I will present three examples of how Mendeley is working to support university libraries and contribute to opening up academic research: 1) Mendeley’s integration as a workflow tool with institutional repositories with the aim of increasing IR deposit rates; 2) Application examples building on Mendeley’s API to showcase what is possible with the newly available type of usage data Mendeley is aggregating; 3) Preview of Mendeley’s library dashboard that will reveal content usage within an institution.

Building an Open Source Staff-Facing Tablet App for Library Assessment - Jason Casden and Joyce Chapman

Building an Open Source Staff-Facing Tablet App for Library Assessment

  • Jason Casden, NCSU Libraries, jason_casden@ncsu.edu
  • Joyce Chapman, NCSU Libraries, joyce_chapman@ncsu.edu

Code4Lib 2011, Thursday 10 February, 09:15 - 09:35

This talk will present a library assessment and software development perspective on the creation and utility of an open source tablet-based tool for collecting and analyzing data about the use of library physical spaces. Building on recent experience developing web-based and native-iPhone library apps, we will discuss complicating implementation-related issues such as platform dependence, intermittent network coverage (data caching), and centralized data synchronization with multiple collectors. HTML5 and co-evolving technologies (specifically, Web SQL client-side storage) can be utilized to balance the various advantages of web-based apps with the performance of native apps, but implementation choices can directly impact both the types of data that can be collected and the cost of adoption of an open source release. Finally, we will use an early prototype of this tool to demonstrate some new assessment possibilities.

(Yet Another) Home-Grown Digital Library System, Built Upon Open Source XML Technologies and Metadata Standards - David Lacy

(Yet Another) Home-Grown Digital Library System, Built Upon Open Source XML Technologies and Metadata Standards

  • David Lacy, Library Software Development Specialist, Villanova University, david.lacy@villanova.edu

Code4Lib 2011, Wednesday 9 February, 14:00 - 14:20

We have recently rearchitected our homegrown digital library utilizing an all-XML framework. The system is comprised of a data repository residing in a native XML database (eXist-DB), a metadata editor constructed using a Java-based XForms processor (Orbeon Forms), and a series of services for image manipulation, OCR processing and OAI-PMH serving. In this talk, I will detail our workflow process from scanning to online publishing, demonstrate the software's flexible configuration and features, and how these steps allow rapid digital preservation and online access. Oh, and it's open source, so I'll show you where to get it as well.

fiwalk With Me: Building Emergent Pre-Ingest Workflows for Digital Archival Records using Open Source Forensic Software - Mark M

fiwalk With Me: Building Emergent Pre-Ingest Workflows for Digital Archival Records using Open Source Forensic Software

  • Mark Matienzo, Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, mark@matienzo.org

Code4Lib 2011, Wednesday 9 February, 13:40 - 14:00

Slides

Video (starts approximately 66 minutes into the stream)

Many of the complications of born-digital records involve preparing them for transfer into a storage or preservation environment. Digital evidence of any kind is easily susceptible to unintentional and intentional modification. This presentation will describe the use of open source forensic software in pre-ingest workflows for digital archives. Digital archivists and other digital curation practitioners can develop emergent processes to prepare records for ingest and transfer using a combination of relatively simple tools. The granularity and simplicity of these tools and procedures provides the possibility for their smooth integration into a digital curation environment built on micro-services.

Let's Get Small: A Microservices Approach to Library Websites - Sean Hannan

Let's Get Small: A Microservices Approach to Library Websites

Slides on SlideShare

  • Sean Hannan, Johns Hopkins University, shannan@jhu.edu

Code4Lib 2011, Wednesday 9 February, 13:20 - 13:40

Most, if not all, library websites are housed and maintained in singular, monolithic content management systems. This is fantastic if the library website is the one place your users go for library information. But it isn't. Users are going to Facebook, checking mobile applications, browsing portals as well as checking the library website. Wouldn't it be great if you could update the information on all of these sites from a single source? Why maintain the library hours in five different places?

In this talk, I will show how breaking the construction of the library website into as-needed, swappable microservices can free your content to live where it needs to, as well as free you from the maintenance headaches usually involved. What kind of microservices, you ask? Well, basic templating and styling is a given, but how about a microservice that gracefully degrades your layouts for older browsers? Or enforces highfalutin typographic rules? Or optimizes your site assets to improve load times? All wonderful little black boxes that allow you to focus on the website and its content, and not the details. I promise at least one diagram. That will burn your eyes.

GIS on the Cheap - Mike Graves

GIS on the Cheap

  • Tim Shearer (for Mike Graves), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, tshearer@email.unc.edu

Code4Lib 2011, Wednesday 9 February, 13:00 - 13:20

Using a few tools that you probably already have laying around your library I'll show how OpenLayers can be used to create a dynamic interface for browsing and searching your digital collections geographically. With very little effort Solr can be made to serve up results directly into OpenLayers creating all sorts of mapping possibilities. With a little more effort a Postgres database can handle complex polygon searches. I'll talk about how we're developing a lightweight GIS framework to provide a new user experience for interacting with a number of our collections in unique ways.

Ask Anything! – Facilitated by Dan Chudnov

Ask Anything!

  • Facilitated by Dan Chudnov

Code4Lib 2011, Wednesday 9 February, 11:15 - 12:00

AKA "Human Search Engine". A chance for you to ask a roomful of Code4Libbers anything that's on your mind: questions seeking answers (short or long), requests for things (hardware, software, skills, or help), or offers of things. We'll keep the pace fast, and the answers faster. Come with questions and line up at the start of the session and we'll go through as many as we can; sometimes we'll stop at finding the right person or people to answer a query and it'll be up to you to find each other after the session. Second time at Code4Lib!

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