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Patrick Hochstenbach: Comics Art in Relationship

planet code4lib - Fri, 2016-04-01 05:10
Homework for the California College of the Arts online course: create a design based on a given existing script. There is ya monster…  Filed under: Comics Tagged: art, comic, election, ink, lineart, pen, politics, trump

Eric Hellman: April Fools is Cancelled This Year

planet code4lib - Fri, 2016-04-01 04:14
Since the Onion dropped their fake news format in January in favor of serious reporting, it's become clear that the web's April Fools Day would be very different this year. Why make stuff up when real life is so hard to believe?

All my ideas for a satirical blog posts seemed too sadly realistic. After people thought my April 1 post last year was real, all my ideas for fake posts about false privacy and the All Writs Act seemed cruel. I thought about doing something about power inequity in libraries and publishing, but then all my crazy imaginings came true on the ACRL SCHOLCOMM list.

So no April Fools post on Go To Hellman this year. Except for this one, of course.

Cynthia Ng: Publishers and the Print Disabled in Canada: Some Get It, Some Don’t

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 22:22
It’s no secret that the print-disabled are a under-supported group. While those who are not print challenged have are able to read all the literature that we understand, print-disabled readers only have access to a small percentage (1-7%) of the world’s published books. There are many efforts underway with: legislation (namely, Marrakesh Treaty), many existing … Continue reading Publishers and the Print Disabled in Canada: Some Get It, Some Don’t

Nick Ruest: 1,203,867 #elxn42 images

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 21:23
1,203,867 #elxn42 images Background

Last August, I began capturing the #elxn42 hashtag as an experiment, and potential research project with Ian Milligan. Once Justin Trudeau was sworn in as the 23rd Prime Minister of Canada, we stopped collection, and began analysing the dataset. We wrote that analysis up for the Code4Lib Journal, which will be published in the next couple weeks. In the interim, you can check out our pre-print here. Included in that dataset is a line-deliminted list of a url to every embedded image tweeted in the dataset; 1,203,867 images. So, I downloaded them. It took a couple days.

getTweetImages

IMAGES=/path/to/elxn42-image-urls.txt cd /path/to/elxn42/images cat $IMAGES | while read line; do wget "$line" done

Now we can start doing image analysis.

1,203,867 images, now what?

I really wanted to take a macroscopic look at all the images, and looking around the best tool for the job looked like montage, an ImageMagick command for creating composite images. But, it wasn't that so simple. 1,203,867 images is a lot of images, and starts getting you thinking about what big data is. Is this big data? I don't know. Maybe?

Attempt #1

I can just point montage at a directory and say go to town, right? NOPE.

$ montage /path/to/1203867/elxn42/images/* elxn42.png

Too many arguments! After glancing through the man page, I find that I can pass it a line-delimited text file with the paths to each file.

file paths find `pwd` -type f -exec cat {} > images.txt

Now that I have that, I can pass montage that file, and I should be golden, right? NOPE.

$ montage @images.txt elxn42.png

I run out of RAM, and get a segmentation fault. This was on a machine with 80GB of RAM.

Attempt #2

Is this big data? What is big data?

Where can I get a machine with a bunch of RAM really quick? Amazon!

I spin up a d2.8xlarge (36 cores and 244GB RAM) EC2 instance, get my dataset over there, ImageMagick installed, and run the command again.

$ montage @images.txt elxn42.png

NOPE. I run out of RAM, and get a segmentation fault. This was on a machine with 244GB of RAM.

Attempt #3

Is this big data? What is big data?

I've failed on two very large machines. Well, what I would consider large machines. So, I start googling, and reading more ImageMagick documentation. Somebody has to have done something like this before, right? Astronomers, they deal with big images right? How do they do this?

Then I find it; ImageMagick Large Image Support/Terapixel support, and the timing couldn't have been better. Ian and I had recently got setup with our ComputeCanada resource allocation. I setup a machine with 8 cores, 12GB RAM, and compiled the latest version of ImageMagick from source; ImageMagick-6.9.3-7.

montage -monitor -define registry:temporary-path=/data/tmp -limit memory 8GiB -limit map 10GiB -limit area 0 @elxn42-tweets-images.txt elxn42.png

Instead of running everything in RAM, which became my issue with this job, I'm able to write all the tmp files ImageMagick creates to disk with -define registry:temporary-path=/data/tmp and limit my memory usage with -limit memory 8GiB -limit map 10GiB -limit area 0. Then knowing this job was going to probably take a long time, -monitor comes in super handy for providing feedback of where the job is at process-wise.

In the end, it took just over 12 days to run the job. It took up 3.5TB of disk space at its peak, and in the end generated a 32GB png file. You can check it out here.

$ pngcheck elxn42.png OK: elxn42.png (138112x135828, 48-bit RGB, non-interlaced, 69.6%). $ exiftool elxn42.png ExifTool Version Number : 9.46 File Name : elxn42.png Directory : . File Size : 32661 MB File Modification Date/Time : 2016:03:30 00:48:44-04:00 File Access Date/Time : 2016:03:30 10:20:26-04:00 File Inode Change Date/Time : 2016:03:30 09:14:09-04:00 File Permissions : rw-rw-r-- File Type : PNG MIME Type : image/png Image Width : 138112 Image Height : 135828 Bit Depth : 16 Color Type : RGB Compression : Deflate/Inflate Filter : Adaptive Interlace : Noninterlaced Gamma : 2.2 White Point X : 0.3127 White Point Y : 0.329 Red X : 0.64 Red Y : 0.33 Green X : 0.3 Green Y : 0.6 Blue X : 0.15 Blue Y : 0.06 Background Color : 65535 65535 65535 Image Size : 138112x135828 Concluding Thoughts

Is this big data? I don't know. I started with 1,203,867 images and made it into a single image. Using 3.5TB of tmp files to create a 32GB image is mind boggling when you start to think about it. But then it isn't when you think about it more. Do I need a machine with 3.5TB of RAM to run this in memory? Or do I just need to design a job with the resources I have and be patient. There are always trade-offs. But, at the end of it all, I'm still sitting here asking myself what is big data?

Maybe this is big data :-)

I extracted every image in the 4.1TB GeoCities WARC collection and you won’t believe what I found next!

(me neither… in short: too many!)

— Ian Milligan (@ianmilligan1) March 31, 2016

@ianmilligan1 so, we're going to montage these, right!?

— nick ruest (@ruebot) March 31, 2016 tags: elxn42ImageMagicktwitterbig data

LITA: Yes, You Can Video! Repeat!

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 15:41

Don’t miss this repeat of the highly popular how-to guide for creating high-impact instructional videos without tearing your hair out.

Tuesday April 12, 2016
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

This LITA Webinar promises a fun time learning how to create instructional videos.

Have you ever wanted to create an engaging and educational instructional video, but felt like you didn’t have the time, ability, or technology? Are you perplexed by all the moving parts that go into creating an effective tutorial? In this session, Anne Burke and Andreas Orphanides will help to demystify the process, breaking it down into easy-to-follow steps, and provide a variety of technical approaches suited to a range of skill sets. They will cover choosing and scoping your topic, scripting and storyboarding, producing the video, and getting it online. They will also address common pitfalls at each stage.

Join

Anne Burke
Undergraduate Instruction & Outreach Librarian
North Carolina State University Libraries

and

Andreas Orphanides
Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning
North Carolina State University Libraries

Then register for the webinar

Full details

Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.

Cost:

  • LITA Member: $45
  • Non-Member: $105
  • Group: $196

Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org.

Open Knowledge Foundation: On the “Open Data Day 2016” wave – Burkina Faso

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 11:35

This blog post was written by Justin Yarga. 

A modest day, but a rich day: Open Data Day in Burkina Faso has helped advance the uptake open data by the open data ecosystem and also helped explore new areas for opening up data. And this time, it is the health sector that was the subject of focus for the open data activists’ community. Let’s go back over a day of discussions and heated debates around open data.

The atmosphere: In the amphitheatre of the Institut Supérieur Privé Polytechnique ISPP, a private high education Institute located at one end of the new town of the capital city, the atmosphere is warm on this Saturday morning. Passionate debates of small groups of people gathered in the amphitheatre  in at certain times make you believe that this a day of classes. An atmosphere created by passion, but also laughter. In fact, when we were talking loudly about health and data, especially where to find the data, an inspired participant came up and thought we were looking at agriculture and open data instead (just imagine). Well, the open data and agriculture parenthesis were closed shortly afterwards but the confusion made here is easy to interpret because open data in Burkina Faso is moving simultaneously in many directions, from agriculture to health. We are a country, the first in Francophone Africa, to engage strongly in the process of opening up data. And it was important to interest more people in this fashionable concept that is the open data.

Recap. Burkina Faso’s open data community has once again succeeded in attracting new sectors and new people in the process of opening up data. The celebration of the Open Data Day took place around the themes of opening up data in health and energy sectors, achieving good results, particularly in terms of open data and energy.

Who were at the Open Data Day Event?

One of the objectives in participating in the Open Data Day was first to present the existing ecosystem in the area of Open Data to the various stakeholders. And then, to build and strengthen partnerships to advance open data in the entire data ecosystem  in Burkina Faso.

Many different stakeholders, active in the field of open data who attended the event were presented, including the “Initiative pour un Burkina Ouvert” (Open Burkina), Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN) Burkina Faso, BEOG NEERE (For a better future), Geek Developers Network (GDN), Burkina Open Data Initiative (BODI), Open Street Map (OSM) and the Fablab Ouagalab. This is a small group yet representative of the entities that are leading the open data movement in Burkina Faso. We can say that since the first meeting held in April 2014 in Jokkolabs, the small community has grown and contributed to an entire open data ecosystem in Burkina Faso. There was also some participants, students from the medical department of the University of Ouagadougou and health professionals, many of whom discovered the concept of open data for the first time.

What did we talk about?

The importance of open data and open data opportunities. The day began with an updating participants about open data. Many of the students and health professionals discovered the concept of open data through the introductory presentation given by Idriss Tinto, Ambassador of Open Knowledge Foundation in Burkina Faso. The presentation stressed the importance of open data for democracy with the edifying example of open elections, and opportunities in areas such as education, agriculture and health. After this theoretical phase, the day continued with more hands-on workshops.

Open data in the health sector: The first workshop focused on open data and health. The idea behind this workshop was to present the opportunities offered by open data in health, to identify key data to be collected, to consider data reusability and finally to lay the foundations of a strategy for opening data in the sector. The discussions revealed many opportunities with open data in the health sector. In addition, they also revealed something very important: the reluctance of actors in the health sector, including students …. fearing intrusion in their trade. The best example to illustrate that point was the idea to open the list of drugs and indications (in which cases the drug must be used, or not used). The students were afraid it would push patients to self-medicate, and the indications have finally been withdrawn from the list of keys information to open, for the moment. 

A citizen-based mapping project: The second workshop of the day focused on a power cuts mapping project in the city of Ouagadougou. This project, supported by Open Burkina, was presented to participants. This ambitious project aims to enable Ouagalais (citizens of Ouagadougou) to adapt to the discomfort of the power cuts by giving them quality information out of data collected from the electricity supply company. For the least, we can say the project has received valuable contributions which will enable it to evolve and take shape very soon.

Lessons learned: Anytime and anywhere where there are discussions about opening data there is also some reluctance. And the organizers of the Open Data Day 2016 in Burkina have done well to invite professionals and students in the health sector to discuss Open Data and health. To say that, when you are interested in a given sector, it is important to involve from the outset professionals of that sector to understand their fears, their reluctance and to move forward together through constructive debates. Sometimes, they are the first allies as data producers and even the beneficiaries of open data. Proof? The NENDO project which have been presented at Open Data Day was made possible thanks to the data collected by a professional of the education sector in the municipality.

At the end, in the global wave of celebration the Open Data Day 2016 (257 events), on Saturday, March 5, 2016 all the participants acknowledged that Burkina Faso has proudly made it.




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Open Knowledge Foundation: On the “Open Data Day 2016” wave – Burkina Faso

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 11:35

This blog post was written by Justin Yarga. 

A modest day, but a rich day: Open Data Day in Burkina Faso has helped advance the uptake open data by the open data ecosystem and also helped explore new areas for opening up data. And this time, it is the health sector that was the subject of focus for the open data activists’ community. Let’s go back over a day of discussions and heated debates around open data.

The atmosphere: In the amphitheatre of the Institut Supérieur Privé Polytechnique ISPP, a private high education Institute located at one end of the new town of the capital city, the atmosphere is warm on this Saturday morning. Passionate debates of small groups of people gathered in the amphitheatre  in at certain times make you believe that this a day of classes. An atmosphere created by passion, but also laughter. In fact, when we were talking loudly about health and data, especially where to find the data, an inspired participant came up and thought we were looking at agriculture and open data instead (just imagine). Well, the open data and agriculture parenthesis were closed shortly afterwards but the confusion made here is easy to interpret because open data in Burkina Faso is moving simultaneously in many directions, from agriculture to health. We are a country, the first in Francophone Africa, to engage strongly in the process of opening up data. And it was important to interest more people in this fashionable concept that is the open data.

Recap. Burkina Faso’s open data community has once again succeeded in attracting new sectors and new people in the process of opening up data. The celebration of the Open Data Day took place around the themes of opening up data in health and energy sectors, achieving good results, particularly in terms of open data and energy.

Who were at the Open Data Day Event?

One of the objectives in participating in the Open Data Day was first to present the existing ecosystem in the area of Open Data to the various stakeholders. And then, to build and strengthen partnerships to advance open data in the entire data ecosystem  in Burkina Faso.

Many different stakeholders, active in the field of open data who attended the event were presented, including the “Initiative pour un Burkina Ouvert” (Open Burkina), Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN) Burkina Faso, BEOG NEERE (For a better future), Geek Developers Network (GDN), Burkina Open Data Initiative (BODI), Open Street Map (OSM) and the Fablab Ouagalab. This is a small group yet representative of the entities that are leading the open data movement in Burkina Faso. We can say that since the first meeting held in April 2014 in Jokkolabs, the small community has grown and contributed to an entire open data ecosystem in Burkina Faso. There was also some participants, students from the medical department of the University of Ouagadougou and health professionals, many of whom discovered the concept of open data for the first time.

What did we talk about?

The importance of open data and open data opportunities. The day began with an updating participants about open data. Many of the students and health professionals discovered the concept of open data through the introductory presentation given by Idriss Tinto, Ambassador of Open Knowledge Foundation in Burkina Faso. The presentation stressed the importance of open data for democracy with the edifying example of open elections, and opportunities in areas such as education, agriculture and health. After this theoretical phase, the day continued with more hands-on workshops.

Open data in the health sector: The first workshop focused on open data and health. The idea behind this workshop was to present the opportunities offered by open data in health, to identify key data to be collected, to consider data reusability and finally to lay the foundations of a strategy for opening data in the sector. The discussions revealed many opportunities with open data in the health sector. In addition, they also revealed something very important: the reluctance of actors in the health sector, including students …. fearing intrusion in their trade. The best example to illustrate that point was the idea to open the list of drugs and indications (in which cases the drug must be used, or not used). The students were afraid it would push patients to self-medicate, and the indications have finally been withdrawn from the list of keys information to open, for the moment. 

A citizen-based mapping project: The second workshop of the day focused on a power cuts mapping project in the city of Ouagadougou. This project, supported by Open Burkina, was presented to participants. This ambitious project aims to enable Ouagalais (citizens of Ouagadougou) to adapt to the discomfort of the power cuts by giving them quality information out of data collected from the electricity supply company. For the least, we can say the project has received valuable contributions which will enable it to evolve and take shape very soon.

Lessons learned: Anytime and anywhere where there are discussions about opening data there is also some reluctance. And the organizers of the Open Data Day 2016 in Burkina have done well to invite professionals and students in the health sector to discuss Open Data and health. To say that, when you are interested in a given sector, it is important to involve from the outset professionals of that sector to understand their fears, their reluctance and to move forward together through constructive debates. Sometimes, they are the first allies as data producers and even the beneficiaries of open data. Proof? The NENDO project which have been presented at Open Data Day was made possible thanks to the data collected by a professional of the education sector in the municipality.

At the end, in the global wave of celebration the Open Data Day 2016 (257 events), on Saturday, March 5, 2016 all the participants acknowledged that Burkina Faso has proudly made it.

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part fc

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 06:26

Part fc of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

DuraSpace News: AVAILABLE: Version 4.5.0 of the Fedora Camel Messaging Toolkit

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 00:00

From Aaron Coburn, Programmer and Systems Administrator, Academic Technology Services, Amherst College

Amherst, MA  I would like to announce the release of version 4.5.0 of the Fedora Camel Messaging Toolkit (fcrepo-camel-toolkit). This toolkit provides a collection of asynchronous integrations between a Fedora 4 repository and external systems.

DuraSpace News: Community Action Story: Developing a Future-forward DSpace User Interface

planet code4lib - Thu, 2016-03-31 00:00

Austin, TX  Software, like fashion, can go out of style, or just simply not work to support modern interactions after a few years. In 2015 the DSpace Project made the decision to to develop a new, single user interface for DSpace to replace aging JSPUI and XMLUI interfaces.

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part 6

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 23:08

Part 6 of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

LITA: Jobs in Information Technology: March 30, 2016

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 20:14

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing. Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week:

Yale University, Archivist – Metadata Specialist, ID 36555BR, New Haven, CT

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a job posting.

Ian Davis: Gorecipes: Fin

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 18:00
Gorecipes: Fin Internet Alchemy

est. 1999

2016 · 2010 · 2005 · 2000 2015 · 2009 · 2004 · 1999 2014 · 2008 · 2003 2012 · 2007 · 2002 2011 · 2006 · 2001                   Wed, Mar 30, 2016 Gorecipes: Fin

How hard can it be to write a book of small, useful programming recipes? Too hard as it turns out.

About a year ago I was prompted by APress publishing to submit a proposal for a book to be called Go Recipes. Knowing nothing about book publishing this surprised me: I’d always assumed that authors pitched ideas to publishers or publishers pitched ideas to authors. It never occurred to me that a publisher would ask an author to devise an idea to pitch out of the blue. I surmised that they must have spotted my Go Cookbook repository on Github. After a couple of weeks of hesitation I put together the table of contents and blurb for the kind of book I would want to use, and one I hoped I could write. The publisher liked what I put together and asked me to write it. After another couple of weeks of hesitation, knowing it would be a massive time commitment. I should have hesitated a bit longer because I completely underestimated that investment of time.

I had plenty of ideas and within a few weeks I had delivered the first chapter and then a few weeks later I managed a second. Then my enthusiasm and energy began to wane: I was busy with other things in my life; I fretted about writing compelling and relevant recipes; I was writing about things I wasn’t that interested in; I worried about repeating myself over and over when explaining things in Go. Most of all I was anxious that some of the things I was writing might not be complete enough or not perceived as correct by other Go programmers.

If you were waiting for that book then I’m sorry to disappoint you: it’s not going to be completed. I decided that it was going to take too long and APress can’t sit around forever waiting for this awesome book to emerge. I don’t know if they’ll take that idea up with someone else. Hopefully they will because it would be a great resource for new Go programmers.

All is not doom and gloom though: I have taken the best and most complete recipes I came up with and added them to the Go Cookbook repository. These are now in the public domain, free for anyone to use for any purpose. Go wild.

ZBW German National Library of Economics: Turning the GND subject headings into a SKOS thesaurus: an experiment

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 17:07

The "Integrated Authority File" (Gemeinsame Normdatei, GND) of the German National Library (DNB), the library networks of the German-speaking countries and many other institutions, is a widely recognized and used authority resource. The authority file comprises persons, institutions, locations and other entity types, in particular subject headings. With more than 134,000 concepts, organized in almost 500 subject categories, the subjects part - the former "Schlagwortnormdatei" (SWD) - is huge. That would make it a nice resource to stress-test SKOS tools - when it would be available in SKOS. A seminar at the DNB on requirements for thesauri on the Semantic Web (slides, in German) provided another reason for the experiment described below.

The GND subject headings are defined using a well-thought-out set of custom classes and properties, the GND Ontology (gndo). The GND links to other vocabularies with SKOS mapping properties, which technically implies for some, but not all, of its subject headings being skos:Concepts. Many of the gndo properties already mirror the SKOS or Isothes properties. For the experiment, the relevant subset of the whole GND was selected by the gndo:SubjectHeadingSensoStricto class. One single SPARQL construct query does the selection and conversion (execute on an example concept). For skos:pref/altLabel, derived from gndo:preferred/variantNameForTheSubjectHeading, German language tags are added. The fine-grained hiearchical relations of GNDO - generic, instantial, partitive - are dumped down to skos:broader/narrower. All original properties of a concept are included in the output of the query.

Some additional work was required to integrate the GND Subject Categories (gndsc), a skos:ConceptScheme of about 484 skos:Concepts which logically build a hierarchy. (In fact, the currently published file puts all subject categories on one level.) The subject headings invariably link by to one or more subject categories, but unfortunately the data has to be downloaded and added separately (with a bit of extension). The linking property from the subject headings, gndo:gndSubjectCategory, was already dumped down to skos:broader in the former query. Finally we add an explicit skos:notation and some bits of metadata about the concept scheme.

This earns us a large skos:ConceptScheme, which we called swdskos and which is currently avaliable in a SPARQL endpoint. Now, we can proceed, and try to prove that generic SKOS tools for display, verification and version history comparisons work at that scale.

Skosmos for thesaurus display

Skosmos is an open source web application for browsing controlled vocabularies, developed by the National Library of Finland. It requires a triple store with the vocabulary loaded. (The Skosmos wiki provides detailed installation and configuration help for this.) The configuration for the GND/SWD vocabulary takes only a few lines, following the provided template. The result can be found at http://zbw.eu/beta/skosmos/swdskos:


 

With marginal effort, we gained a structured concept display, a very nice browsing and hierarchical view interface, and a powerful search - out of the box. The initial alphabetical display takes a few seconds, due to the large number of terms for most of the index letters. In a production setting, that could be improved by adding a Squid or Varnish cache. The navigation from concept to concept is far below one second, so the tool seems well suited for practical use even with larger-than-usual vocabularies. For GND, it offers an alternative to the existing access over the DNB portal, more focused on browsing contexts and with a more precise search.

Quality assurance with qSKOS

Large knowledge organization systems are prone to human mistakes, which creep in even with strict rules and careful editing. Some maintenance systems try to catch some of these errors, but let slip others. So one of the really great things about SKOS as a general format for knowledge organization systems is that generic tools can be developed, which catch more and more classes of errors. qSKOS has identified a number of wide-spread possible quality issues, on which it provides detailed analytic information. Of course, often it depends on the vocabulary, which types if issues are considered as errors - for example, it is expected that most GND subject headings lack a definition, so a list of 100,000+ such concepts is not helpful, whereas the list of the (in total 3) cyclic hierarchical relations is. The parametrization we use for STW seems to provide useful results here too:

java -jar qSKOS-cmd.jar analyze -np -d -c ol,chr,usr,rc,mc,ipl,dlv,urc swdskos.ttl.gz -o qskos_extended.log

The tool has already been tested with very large vocabularies (LCSH, e.g.) On the swdskos dataset, it runs for 8 minutes, but it provides results, which could not be obtained otherwise. For example, the list of overlapping labels (report) reveals some strange clashes (example). Standard SKOS tools thus could complement the quality assurance procedures which are already in place.

Version comparisons with skos-history

The skos-history method allows to track changes in knowlege organization systems. It had been developed in the context of the STW overhaul. With swdskos, it proves to be applicable to much larger KOS. The loading of the three versions and the computation of all version deltas take almost half an hour (on a moderately sized virtual machine). That way, for example, we can see the 638 concepts, which were deleted between the Oct 2015 and the Feb 2016 dump of GND. Some checked concept URIs return concepts with different URIs, but the same preferred label, so we can assume that duplicates have been removed here. The added_concepts query can be extended to make use of the - often underestimated - GND subject categories for organizing the query results, as is shown here (list filtered by the notation for computer science and data processing):

These queries only scratch the surface of what could be done by comparing multiple versions of the GND subject headings. Custom queries could try to reveal maintenance patterns, or, for example, trace the uptake of the finer-grained hierarchical properties (generic/instantial/partitive) used in GND.

Summing up

Generic SKOS tools seem to be useful to complement custom tools and processes for specialized knowledge organization systems. The tools considered here have shown no scalability issues with large vocabularies. The publication of an additional experimental SKOS version of the subject headings part of the GND linked data dump could perhaps instigate further research on the development of vocabulary.

The code and the data of the experiment are available here.

GND subject headings as SKOS thesaurus Linked data   Thesaurus  

District Dispatch: Library funding dance: two steps forward, one step back

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 16:54

Congratulations . . . and thank you! Over the past two weeks, we’ve issued several calls-to-action asking you to ask your Members of Congress in both chambers to sign four letters urging their colleagues on the powerful Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate to support maximum funding in FY 2017 for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) programs. And you really responded!

One step forward

Nearly every Member of Congress (529 out of 535) got at least one of the 14,000+ emails, over 740 tweets, and many phone calls with which you answered our call, and some local Congressional offices were even visited personally by library advocates! All that work was rewarded with strong bipartisan support for our four LSTA and IAL “Dear Appropriator” letters, which, on balance, garnered essentially the same solid number of signatures this year as last. That delivered a strong message of support for these critical programs to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees as they begin to sharpen their budget cutting axes in earnest. But . . .

Your support, and those letters, didn’t arrive a moment too soon. For the second year in a row, with the blessing of House Speaker Paul Ryan, the formal Resolution released by the House Budget Committee (a non-binding document that nonetheless conveys the majority’s philosophy) expressly suggests that ALL federal library funding — and with it the Institute of Museum and Library Services that administers LSTA — could be completely eliminated to achieve the House majority’s budget-cutting goals! Regardless of whether this Budget Resolution is adopted (they often aren’t), it’s just the beginning of the FY2017 appropriations process. Sadly, LSTA and IAL will be on the potential “chopping block” almost until year’s end.

So, our advocacy for and defense of LSTA and IAL will need to be an ongoing effort. As critical votes near, there will certainly be more calls-to-action coming. (If you haven’t already, please do take a few seconds now to sign up for future alerts.) Meantime, there’s one sure-fire way to help keep support for LSTA and IAL strong: say “Thanks!” to your Senators and Representative if they signed our LSTA and/or IAL “Dear Appropriator” letters.

That’s as easy as one, two three:

  1. Check out this handy “Champions” chart of who supported LSTA and/or IAL.
  2. If you see at least one of your Member of Congress’ names, or if you want to find out who your Members are, enter your zip code here.
  3. Just click on their name(s) in the list that pops up to email them directly.

Of course, if you’d prefer to tweet or call our LSTA and IAL supporters instead that would be great too. After checking out our Champions chart, consult the Member directories for each chamber linked below for the handles and numbers you’ll need to reach your Senators’ and/or Representative’s offices.

Members of Congress love to hear from constituents, especially with a well-deserved “thank you,” and there’s no easier or better way to keep them engaged and strong for LSTA and IAL. Please, check out our Champions chart and send your message of appreciation now. It’s strategic. It’s important. And it’s just plain good manners, to boot!

The post Library funding dance: two steps forward, one step back appeared first on District Dispatch.

OCLC Dev Network: Announging Linked Data Webinar and Blog Series

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 16:00

Developer Network will be sharing blog posts and hosting practice-based webinars over the next three months to help educate those who have little or no experience working with linked data.

LITA: LITA Top Tech Trends Panel at ALA Annual 2016

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 15:00

Help LITA celebrate the kick off to it’s 50th year by participating or nominating a Top Tech Trends panelist.

Submit your nomination here.

The LITA Top Technology Trends Committee is currently seeking nominations for panelists to participate in their popular panel discussion session at ALA Annual 2016. We are looking for a diverse panel of speakers ready to offer insights into a range of technology topics impacting libraries today and into the future.

Have someone you’d love to hear share their thoughts about current and future trends in technology? Want to share your own thoughts on some tech topics? Let us know what you or your nominee have to offer to the discussion!

For more details and a chance to nominate yourself or someone else, visit this site.

Nominations are due by April 15th, 2016.

Spread the Word!!!

Emily Clasper
Suffolk Cooperative Library System
LITA Top Tech Trends Committee Chair
emily@suffolknet.org

Max Planck Digital Library: MPG.ReNa via https only

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 12:48

The MPG Resource Navigator MPG.ReNa is now accessible via https only.

If in doubt, please double-check any routines and applications loading or embedding content via MPG.ReNa APIs.

Please note that you may need to re-subscribe to resource feeds, or update URLs of RSS widgets in your Content Management System, etc.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

Open Knowledge Foundation: What happened during Open Data Day 2016 in Aix en Provence?

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 12:38

This blog post was written by Samuel Goeta and the team in Open Knowledge France

This year, Open Data Day in France left Paris after hosting us in several tech hubs in the capital: Telecom ParisTech in 2013, Simplon in 2014 and La Paillasse en 2015. However, Paris still celebrated Open Data Day online. Etalab, the French government open data taskforce, made a blog post celebrating their favorite open data apps and Open Street Maps announced that there are now 400 million objects in its French database.

 

On the 5th of March, Open Knowledge France headed South to the city of Aix en Provence, near Marseille. Yelloworking hosted the Open Data Day, and it was the first event organized at the new villa of the coworking space. Thanks to Open Knowledge’s Open Data Day mini grant, we were able to start the event with delicious Italian buffet that gave us plenty of energy for hacking.
Anonymal, a local webtv, shoot a short video report (in French) on the event. In two minutes, it explains the concept of the open data day and shows some of the activities that happened on March 5th in Aix en Provence.

Le Yelloworking accueille l’Open Data Day à Aix-en-Provence from anonymal tv on Vimeo.

Our main activities Activity #1: Hack a coffee machine

The concept:

  1. Open the guts of the coffee machine of the coworking space (ask premission first!)
  2. Connect an Arduino board to the buttons of the machine
  3. Collect data on each coffee made: time, length and strength of the coffee.

This data will be used to monitor the activity of the coworking space as each member or visitor usually consumes a coffee.

Why it matters: Open Knowledge can seriously benefit from open hardware devices for automatic real-time data collection. This activity was one of the rare bridge between the open hardware and open data movements which rarely speak to each other.

How did it turn out? Well, the Arduino starter kit is indeed…a good start. We managed to connect the buttons, monitor the strength of a coffee, to record on a log when each coffee is being made. The code has already been published but we still need more equipment to actually publish data.

What’s next: Another hacknight is planned, and the data will be visualised live on Yelloworking website.


Activity #2: Open Yelloworking data

The concept: Yelloworking is a transparent coworking space which already provides regular updates on its incomes, expenses and its activities. We used Open Data Day to push transparency one step further by opening data on Yelloworking’s revenues and visualizing it.   

Why it matters: Open Business models are promising to develop transparent business and increase consumer trust. This is especially true for coworking spaces which are about strengthening trust and tightening ties between members. Open data on revenues can be a powerful way to renew transparency in the corporate sector.

How did it turn out? Samuel, as both the host of the event and a partner at Yelloworking, went through every single invoice and reported it in a CSV file. Then, he visualized the data using Raw, an incredible tool made by Density Design. Data has been published on NosDonnees.fr, a CKAN instance run by Open Knowledge France and Regards Citoyens.

What’s next: Yelloworking now wants to open data on its operating expenses. However, the work to report this information will take much longer.  

 

Activity #3: Deliberations of the city council

The concept: The city council of Aix en Provence, as everywhere in France, votes on deliberations (public debates by city officials). These protocols are online, and can be downloaded as a PDF, but for the average citizen, inspecting and understanding the official lingo in these files is a fastidious job. PourAix, a young collective dedicated to mobilisation and citizens participation, had an excellent idea to map these complicated documents to make local policymaking more accessible. For each protocol, they identified the place that are affected by the decision and created a map. The participants crowdsourced this information and reported the precise place concerned by each deliberation in a file in order to create a map including date, location, name of the elected official proposing the bill, full text of the document, decisions taken.

Why it matters not only here: We know that much extremely valuable information about local life is still stuck in PDF. Crowdsourcing can, in a matter of hours, make these information much more accessible and processable. This in the end, can help and foster accountability.

How did it turn out? More than 100 deliberations were mapped. Crowdsourcing helped PourAix to map all 2015 deliberations. The data were published on their data portal data.pouraix.fr, on data.gouv.fr and mapped using Umap, OSM France ’s tool.

What’s next:  These crowdsourced data will be used to create a monitoring tool for citizens on the model of NosDeputes.fr, the Parliament Monitoring Tool made by Regards Citoyens.

 

Voir en plein écran

 




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Open Knowledge Foundation: What happened during Open Data Day 2016 in Aix en Provence?

planet code4lib - Wed, 2016-03-30 12:38

This blog post was written by Samuel Goeta and the team in Open Knowledge France

This year, Open Data Day in France left Paris after hosting us in several tech hubs in the capital: Telecom ParisTech in 2013, Simplon in 2014 and La Paillasse en 2015. However, Paris still celebrated Open Data Day online. Etalab, the French government open data taskforce, made a blog post celebrating their favorite open data apps and Open Street Maps announced that there are now 400 million objects in its French database.

 

On the 5th of March, Open Knowledge France headed South to the city of Aix en Provence, near Marseille. Yelloworking hosted the Open Data Day, and it was the first event organized at the new villa of the coworking space. Thanks to Open Knowledge’s Open Data Day mini grant, we were able to start the event with delicious Italian buffet that gave us plenty of energy for hacking. Anonymal, a local webtv, shoot a short video report (in French) on the event. In two minutes, it explains the concept of the open data day and shows some of the activities that happened on March 5th in Aix en Provence.

Le Yelloworking accueille l’Open Data Day à Aix-en-Provence from anonymal tv on Vimeo.

Our main activities Activity #1: Hack a coffee machine

The concept:

  1. Open the guts of the coffee machine of the coworking space (ask premission first!)
  2. Connect an Arduino board to the buttons of the machine
  3. Collect data on each coffee made: time, length and strength of the coffee.

This data will be used to monitor the activity of the coworking space as each member or visitor usually consumes a coffee.

Why it matters: Open Knowledge can seriously benefit from open hardware devices for automatic real-time data collection. This activity was one of the rare bridge between the open hardware and open data movements which rarely speak to each other.

How did it turn out? Well, the Arduino starter kit is indeed…a good start. We managed to connect the buttons, monitor the strength of a coffee, to record on a log when each coffee is being made. The code has already been published but we still need more equipment to actually publish data.

What’s next: Another hacknight is planned, and the data will be visualised live on Yelloworking website.

Activity #2: Open Yelloworking data

The concept: Yelloworking is a transparent coworking space which already provides regular updates on its incomes, expenses and its activities. We used Open Data Day to push transparency one step further by opening data on Yelloworking’s revenues and visualizing it.   

Why it matters: Open Business models are promising to develop transparent business and increase consumer trust. This is especially true for coworking spaces which are about strengthening trust and tightening ties between members. Open data on revenues can be a powerful way to renew transparency in the corporate sector.

How did it turn out? Samuel, as both the host of the event and a partner at Yelloworking, went through every single invoice and reported it in a CSV file. Then, he visualized the data using Raw, an incredible tool made by Density Design. Data has been published on NosDonnees.fr, a CKAN instance run by Open Knowledge France and Regards Citoyens.

What’s next: Yelloworking now wants to open data on its operating expenses. However, the work to report this information will take much longer.  

 

Activity #3: Deliberations of the city council

The concept: The city council of Aix en Provence, as everywhere in France, votes on deliberations (public debates by city officials). These protocols are online, and can be downloaded as a PDF, but for the average citizen, inspecting and understanding the official lingo in these files is a fastidious job. PourAix, a young collective dedicated to mobilisation and citizens participation, had an excellent idea to map these complicated documents to make local policymaking more accessible. For each protocol, they identified the place that are affected by the decision and created a map. The participants crowdsourced this information and reported the precise place concerned by each deliberation in a file in order to create a map including date, location, name of the elected official proposing the bill, full text of the document, decisions taken.

Why it matters not only here: We know that much extremely valuable information about local life is still stuck in PDF. Crowdsourcing can, in a matter of hours, make these information much more accessible and processable. This in the end, can help and foster accountability.

How did it turn out? More than 100 deliberations were mapped. Crowdsourcing helped PourAix to map all 2015 deliberations. The data were published on their data portal data.pouraix.fr, on data.gouv.fr and mapped using Umap, OSM France ’s tool.

What’s next:  These crowdsourced data will be used to create a monitoring tool for citizens on the model of NosDeputes.fr, the Parliament Monitoring Tool made by Regards Citoyens.

 

Voir en plein écran

 

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