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Ng, Cynthia: BCLA 2014: For the love of paper: the book industry today

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 21:37
Panel of 6 on the book publishing industry. Hal Wake There will always be a place for slow food and fine dining, similarly, the printed book will always have a place. Wattpad allows writers to post writing. One writer might break $100k. The medium allows people who are interested in genre to find you, sample […]

Ng, Cynthia: BCLA 2014: For the love of paper: the book industry today

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 21:37
Panel of 6 on the book publishing industry. Hal Wake There will always be a place for slow food and fine dining, similarly, the printed book will always have a place. Wattpad allows writers to post writing. One writer might break $100k. The medium allows people who are interested in genre to find you, sample […]

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: ALA Washington Office Submits Comments on IAL

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 20:40

On Monday, that ALA Washington Office submitted comments on the U.S. Department of Education’s Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) grant program.

IAL was funded in FY 2014 at $25 million and is a competitive grant program where, by law, a minimum of half of this money must go low-income to update and maintain their school libraries.  The rest of the money goes to national non-profits that work for childhood literacy.

An example of IAL helping students and the community is in the Lowndes County Public School in Alabama.  The Lowndes Schools received an IAL grant in 2012 and they are using that award to help implement their Transforming School Libraries to Facilitate a Culture of Learning (TSLFCL) goal in their schools.  This money has been used to update the school library materials including books, e-readers, computers, and other such materials that are needed for an up-to-date school library.   This grant has also been used to open the school libraries on Saturdays and provide professional development for the district’s school librarians.

Consequently, this grant has allowed the Lowndes Schools to increase their number of reading materials being checked out by 63 percent.  The e-readers have provided many students simultaneous access to the popular titles so the wait time for high-demand books has been eliminated.  Students are also able to get immediate access to all the e-books that are available.  Furthermore, the school district has opened the school libraries on Saturdays and Saturday participation has exceeded the district’s goal by 50 percent.

The post ALA Washington Office Submits Comments on IAL appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: ALA Washington Office Submits Comments on IAL

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 20:40

On Monday, that ALA Washington Office submitted comments on the U.S. Department of Education’s Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) grant program.

IAL was funded in FY 2014 at $25 million and is a competitive grant program where, by law, a minimum of half of this money must go low-income to update and maintain their school libraries.  The rest of the money goes to national non-profits that work for childhood literacy.

An example of IAL helping students and the community is in the Lowndes County Public School in Alabama.  The Lowndes Schools received an IAL grant in 2012 and they are using that award to help implement their Transforming School Libraries to Facilitate a Culture of Learning (TSLFCL) goal in their schools.  This money has been used to update the school library materials including books, e-readers, computers, and other such materials that are needed for an up-to-date school library.   This grant has also been used to open the school libraries on Saturdays and provide professional development for the district’s school librarians.

Consequently, this grant has allowed the Lowndes Schools to increase their number of reading materials being checked out by 63 percent.  The e-readers have provided many students simultaneous access to the popular titles so the wait time for high-demand books has been eliminated.  Students are also able to get immediate access to all the e-books that are available.  Furthermore, the school district has opened the school libraries on Saturdays and Saturday participation has exceeded the district’s goal by 50 percent.

The post ALA Washington Office Submits Comments on IAL appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: House budget dismisses role of IMLS

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 20:24

In a new budget released today from Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI), the House Budget Committee Chairman denounces the critical role that the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) plays in supporting civic engagement, literacy and lifelong learning in more than 123,000 libraries nationwide. Rep. Ryan recommends that the federal government not have a role in libraries and that Congress shift the federal agency’s responsibilities to the private sector in his 2015 fiscal year budget resolution.

A Hedberg librarian helps a patron apply for college. Photo by Hedberg Public Library.

More than $180 million has been appropriated to the Institute for Museum and Library Services through September 2014 to help libraries make information and services available to the citizens they serve. American Library Association (ALA) President Barbara Stripling released a statement in response to Rep. Ryan’s unfortunate budget proposal (pdf).

“Library funding support from the Institute for Museum and Library Services wields large returns in the form of literate and civically engaged communities,” Stripling said in a statement. “We hope that Congress will support the important role that the Institute for Museum and Library Services plays in supporting educated communities by rejecting the House Budget resolution.”

Facts about library use in Rep. Paul Ryan’s own state of Wisconsin:

  • Just blocks from Rep. Ryan’s Wisconsin office, more than 716,000 visitors used the Hedberg Public Library in Janesville, Wisconsin to access library computers and research databases, check out books and receive job training in 2013.
  • More than 65 percent of Wisconsin libraries report that they are the only free access point to Internet in their communities.
  • The Institute of Museum and Library Services administered more than $2.8 million in the 2014 fiscal year to help Wisconsin libraries prepare young students for school and provide lifelong learning opportunities for all Wisconsin residents.
  • The state of Wisconsin reported that more than 215,000 children participated in summer reading programs in state public libraries.

Moving forward, the American Library Association is asking library users, students, parents and teachers to contact their U.S. Senators and Representatives by going to the Legislative Action Center and urge them to support funding in the 2015 fiscal year for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL).

Advocates can support IMLS by tweeting Rep. Ryan at @RepPaulRyan.

The post House budget dismisses role of IMLS appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: House budget dismisses role of IMLS

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 20:24

In a new budget released today from Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI), the House Budget Committee Chairman denounces the critical role that the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) plays in supporting civic engagement, literacy and lifelong learning in more than 123,000 libraries nationwide. Rep. Ryan recommends that the federal government not have a role in libraries and that Congress shift the federal agency’s responsibilities to the private sector in his 2015 fiscal year budget resolution.

A Hedberg librarian helps a patron apply for college. Photo by Hedberg Public Library.

More than $180 million has been appropriated to the Institute for Museum and Library Services through September 2014 to help libraries make information and services available to the citizens they serve. American Library Association (ALA) President Barbara Stripling released a statement in response to Rep. Ryan’s unfortunate budget proposal (pdf).

“Library funding support from the Institute for Museum and Library Services wields large returns in the form of literate and civically engaged communities,” Stripling said in a statement. “We hope that Congress will support the important role that the Institute for Museum and Library Services plays in supporting educated communities by rejecting the House Budget resolution.”

Facts about library use in Rep. Paul Ryan’s own state of Wisconsin:

  • Just blocks from Rep. Ryan’s Wisconsin office, more than 716,000 visitors used the Hedberg Public Library in Janesville, Wisconsin to access library computers and research databases, check out books and receive job training in 2013.
  • More than 65 percent of Wisconsin libraries report that they are the only free access point to Internet in their communities.
  • The Institute of Museum and Library Services administered more than $2.8 million in the 2014 fiscal year to help Wisconsin libraries prepare young students for school and provide lifelong learning opportunities for all Wisconsin residents.
  • The state of Wisconsin reported that more than 215,000 children participated in summer reading programs in state public libraries.

Moving forward, the American Library Association is asking library users, students, parents and teachers to contact their U.S. Senators and Representatives by going to the Legislative Action Center and urge them to support funding in the 2015 fiscal year for the Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL).

Advocates can support IMLS by tweeting Rep. Ryan at @RepPaulRyan.

The post House budget dismisses role of IMLS appeared first on District Dispatch.

Code4Lib 2010 Conf Videos: Mobile Web App Design: Getting Started - Michael Doran

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 19:23
Creating or adapting library web applications for mobile devices such as the iPhone, Android, and Palm Pre is not hard, but it does require learning some new tools, new techniques, and new approaches. From the Tao of mobile web app design to using mobile device SDKs for their emulators, this presentation will give you a jump-start on mobile cross-platform design, development, and testing. And all illustrated with a real-world mobile library web application.

Code4Lib 2010 Conf Videos: Mobile Web App Design: Getting Started - Michael Doran

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 19:23
Creating or adapting library web applications for mobile devices such as the iPhone, Android, and Palm Pre is not hard, but it does require learning some new tools, new techniques, and new approaches. From the Tao of mobile web app design to using mobile device SDKs for their emulators, this presentation will give you a jump-start on mobile cross-platform design, development, and testing. And all illustrated with a real-world mobile library web application.

Open Library: Open Library Scheduled Hardware Maintenance (Completed)

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 19:06

Open Library will be down from 5:00PM to 6:00PM SF time (PDT, UTC/GMT -7 hours) on April 1, 2014 due to a scheduled hardware maintenance.

We’ll post updates here and on @openlibrary twitter.

Thank you for your cooperation.

UPDATE 5:23PM PDT - openlibrary.org is back online now.

Open Library: Open Library Scheduled Hardware Maintenance (Completed)

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 19:06

Open Library will be down from 5:00PM to 6:00PM SF time (PDT, UTC/GMT -7 hours) on April 1, 2014 due to a scheduled hardware maintenance.

We’ll post updates here and on @openlibrary twitter.

Thank you for your cooperation.

UPDATE 5:23PM PDT - openlibrary.org is back online now.

Miedema, John: New gear for April canoe-camping trip. I resisted buying a portable zip-line kit — that would have been fun!

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 18:53

It looks like the snow and ice might clear just in time for a canoe-camping trip at the end of April. Before each trip I make that dangerous visit to Mountain Equipment Coop and pick up a few more items for my ‘survival’ collection. This time: a small hatchet for better fire starting, a foraging book to supplement my otherwise well-prepared meals, and an inexpensive pair of binoculars for bird and stargazing. I resisted buying a portable zip-line kit — that  would have been fun! (I have a boring policy of not buying anything on the day that I think of it. It will go in the parking lot for next time.)

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: OGR’s monthly recap: Feb-Mar

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 16:36

In an effort to keep you informed on what’s going on in Washington and the letters that we have sent, OGR will now have a monthly recap.  Being the first of these, today’s blog post will cover both February and March.

February 10, 2014

ALA joined with 23 like-minded organizations in a letter (pdf) to Director Holden, of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to petition for OSTP to conduct a public comment process on big data and the future of privacy.

February 24, 2014

ALA united with 26 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to members of the House of Representatives urging them to vote for H.R. 1211, the FOIA Oversight and Implementation Act of 2014.  H.R. 1211 is a bipartisan bill that would “amend the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to promote greater government transparency and accountability”. On February 25th, the bill passed the House and a day later was sent to the Senate where it was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

March 5, 2014

ALA signed on to a letter (pdf) urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to move forward as quickly as possible to implement a Connect America Fund (CAF) mechanism for small, rural, rate-of-return-regulated carriers that will provide sufficient and predictable support for broadband-capable networks across all of rural America. In total, 37 organizations signed the letter including the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools, and NTCA-The Rural Broadband Association, among others.

March 10, 2014

OGR and OITP worked with the Internet Archive to file a “friend of the court” brief (pdf) in David Leon Riley v. State of California and United States v. Brima Wurie, two Supreme Court cases examining the constitutionality of cell phone searches after police arrests. In the amicus brief, both nonprofit organizations argue that warrantless cell phone searches violate privacy principles protected by the Fourth Amendment. In the brief, the Internet Archive and the American Library Association argued that reading choices are at the heart of the expectation of personal privacy guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment. Allowing police officers to rummage through the smartphones of arrestees is akin to giving government officials permission to search a person’s entire library and reading history.

 March 12, 2014

ALA joined with 32 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to President Obama, urging him “to expedite the declassification of the report by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) on the interrogation and detention practices of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)”.

March 13, 2014

The ALA, PLA, ALSC, AASL and the Medical Library Association, along with 1,060 other labor, health, and education organization sent a letter (pdf) to Congress asking that $163.6 billion be allocated to the House and Senate Labor, Health, and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittees for FY 2015.

March 24, 2014

ALA joined 15 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to Chairman Lamar Smith and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson of the House of Representatives’ Committee on Science, Space and Technology expressing opposition to Section 303 of the FIRST Act.

Library Advocates Gear Up for National Library Legislative Day: Register Now

Hundreds of librarians, parents and library supporters will travel to Washington, D.C. on May 5th and 6th to meet with members of Congress and discuss key library issues during the American Library Association’s 40th annual National Library Legislative Day. The event will focus on supporting federal funding for national libraries. Those who cannot attend National Library Legislative Day in person will have the option to contact Congress as part of Virtual Library Legislative Day. To register for the advocacy day, go to www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/nlld.

The post OGR’s monthly recap: Feb-Mar appeared first on District Dispatch.

ALA Equitable Access to Electronic Content: OGR’s monthly recap: Feb-Mar

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 16:36

In an effort to keep you informed on what’s going on in Washington and the letters that we have sent, OGR will now have a monthly recap.  Being the first of these, today’s blog post will cover both February and March.

February 10, 2014

ALA joined with 23 like-minded organizations in a letter (pdf) to Director Holden, of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to petition for OSTP to conduct a public comment process on big data and the future of privacy.

February 24, 2014

ALA united with 26 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to members of the House of Representatives urging them to vote for H.R. 1211, the FOIA Oversight and Implementation Act of 2014.  H.R. 1211 is a bipartisan bill that would “amend the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to promote greater government transparency and accountability”. On February 25th, the bill passed the House and a day later was sent to the Senate where it was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

March 5, 2014

ALA signed on to a letter (pdf) urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to move forward as quickly as possible to implement a Connect America Fund (CAF) mechanism for small, rural, rate-of-return-regulated carriers that will provide sufficient and predictable support for broadband-capable networks across all of rural America. In total, 37 organizations signed the letter including the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools, and NTCA-The Rural Broadband Association, among others.

March 10, 2014

OGR and OITP worked with the Internet Archive to file a “friend of the court” brief (pdf) in David Leon Riley v. State of California and United States v. Brima Wurie, two Supreme Court cases examining the constitutionality of cell phone searches after police arrests. In the amicus brief, both nonprofit organizations argue that warrantless cell phone searches violate privacy principles protected by the Fourth Amendment. In the brief, the Internet Archive and the American Library Association argued that reading choices are at the heart of the expectation of personal privacy guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment. Allowing police officers to rummage through the smartphones of arrestees is akin to giving government officials permission to search a person’s entire library and reading history.

 March 12, 2014

ALA joined with 32 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to President Obama, urging him “to expedite the declassification of the report by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI) on the interrogation and detention practices of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)”.

March 13, 2014

The ALA, PLA, ALSC, AASL and the Medical Library Association, along with 1,060 other labor, health, and education organization sent a letter (pdf) to Congress asking that $163.6 billion be allocated to the House and Senate Labor, Health, and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittees for FY 2015.

March 24, 2014

ALA joined 15 other organizations in a letter (pdf) to Chairman Lamar Smith and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson of the House of Representatives’ Committee on Science, Space and Technology expressing opposition to Section 303 of the FIRST Act.

Library Advocates Gear Up for National Library Legislative Day: Register Now

Hundreds of librarians, parents and library supporters will travel to Washington, D.C. on May 5th and 6th to meet with members of Congress and discuss key library issues during the American Library Association’s 40th annual National Library Legislative Day. The event will focus on supporting federal funding for national libraries. Those who cannot attend National Library Legislative Day in person will have the option to contact Congress as part of Virtual Library Legislative Day. To register for the advocacy day, go to www.ala.org/advocacy/advleg/nlld.

The post OGR’s monthly recap: Feb-Mar appeared first on District Dispatch.

Open Knowledge Foundation: Happy Spring Cleaning, Community Style

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 11:28

Crazy about happy? Call it spring fever, but I am slightly addicted to the beautiful creativity of people around the world and their Happy videos (map). We are just one small corner of the Internet and want to connect you to Open Knowledge. To do this, we, your community managers, need to bring in the Happy. How can we connect you, meet your feedback, continue the spirit of global Open Data Day, and celebrate our upcoming 10 year anniversary as Open Knowledge? Tall order, but consider this.

Open Knowledge is a thriving network. We exist because of all of you and the incremental efforts each of you make on a wide-range of issues around the world. The way forward is to flip the community around. We will focus on connecting you to each other. Call it inspired by Happy or the Zooinverse mission, but we heard your input into the community survey and want to meet it.

So, here are 4 key ways we aim to connect you: 1. Community Tumblr

Greece, MENA, and Tanzania – these are just some of the locations of Open Knowledge Stories on the Community Tumblr. We know that many of you have stories to tell. Have something to say or share? Submit a story. Just one look at the recent WordPress about 10 moments around the world gives me inspiration that the stories and impact exist, we just need to share more.

The Open Knowledge Community Tumblr

2. Wiki Reboot

As with every spring cleaning, you start by dusting a corner and end up at the store buying bookshelves and buckets of paint. The Open Knowledge wiki has long been ridden with spam and dust bunnies. We’ve given it a firm content kick to make it your space. We are inspired by the OpenStreetMap community wiki.

What next? Hop on over and create your Wiki User account – Tell us about yourself, See ways to Get Involved and Start Editing. We think that the wiki is the best way to get a global view of all things Open Knowledge and meet each other. Let’s make this our community hub.

3. Community Sessions

We have a core goal to connect you to each other. This April we are hosting a number of online community events to bring you together. Previously, we had great success with a number of online sessions around Open Data Day and OKFestival.

The Community Sessions can be in a number of forms: a scheduled IRC chat, a community Google hangout, a technical sprint or hackpad editathon. We are using the wiki to plan. All events will be announced on the blog and be listed in the main Open Knowledge events calendar.

Wiki planning for the Community Sessions:

The first session is Wednesday, April 2, 2014 at 14:30 UTC/10:30 ET. We will host an IRC chat all about the wiki. To join, hop onto irc.freenode.net #okfn. IRC is a free text-based chat service.

4. OkFestival

OKFestival is coming soon. You told us that events is one of the biggest ways that you feel connected to Open Knowledge. As you many know, there are regular online meetups for School of Data, CKAN and OpenSpending Communities. Events connect and converge all of us with location and ideas.

Are you planning your own events where you live or on a particular open topic? We can help in a few ways:

  • Let us know about the events you’re running! Let’s discover together how many people are joining Open knowledge events all around the world!
  • Never organized an event before or curious to try a new type of gathering? Check out our Events Handbook for tips and tricks and contact our Events Team if you have questions or feedback about it
  • Want to connect with other community members to talk about your events, share skills, create international series of events together? Ping our global mailing list!

Have some ideas on how we can bring on the happy more? Drop us a line on the okfn-discuss mailing list or reach out directly – heather DOT leson AT okfn DOT org.

(Photo by SpaceAgeBoy)

Open Knowledge Foundation: Happy Spring Cleaning, Community Style

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 11:28

Crazy about happy? Call it spring fever, but I am slightly addicted to the beautiful creativity of people around the world and their Happy videos (map). We are just one small corner of the Internet and want to connect you to Open Knowledge. To do this, we, your community managers, need to bring in the Happy. How can we connect you, meet your feedback, continue the spirit of global Open Data Day, and celebrate our upcoming 10 year anniversary as Open Knowledge? Tall order, but consider this.

Open Knowledge is a thriving network. We exist because of all of you and the incremental efforts each of you make on a wide-range of issues around the world. The way forward is to flip the community around. We will focus on connecting you to each other. Call it inspired by Happy or the Zooinverse mission, but we heard your input into the community survey and want to meet it.

So, here are 4 key ways we aim to connect you: 1. Community Tumblr

Greece, MENA, and Tanzania – these are just some of the locations of Open Knowledge Stories on the Community Tumblr. We know that many of you have stories to tell. Have something to say or share? Submit a story. Just one look at the recent WordPress about 10 moments around the world gives me inspiration that the stories and impact exist, we just need to share more.

The Open Knowledge Community Tumblr

2. Wiki Reboot

As with every spring cleaning, you start by dusting a corner and end up at the store buying bookshelves and buckets of paint. The Open Knowledge wiki has long been ridden with spam and dust bunnies. We’ve given it a firm content kick to make it your space. We are inspired by the OpenStreetMap community wiki.

What next? Hop on over and create your Wiki User account – Tell us about yourself, See ways to Get Involved and Start Editing. We think that the wiki is the best way to get a global view of all things Open Knowledge and meet each other. Let’s make this our community hub.

3. Community Sessions

We have a core goal to connect you to each other. This April we are hosting a number of online community events to bring you together. Previously, we had great success with a number of online sessions around Open Data Day and OKFestival.

The Community Sessions can be in a number of forms: a scheduled IRC chat, a community Google hangout, a technical sprint or hackpad editathon. We are using the wiki to plan. All events will be announced on the blog and be listed in the main Open Knowledge events calendar.

Wiki planning for the Community Sessions:

The first session is Wednesday, April 2, 2014 at 14:30 UTC/10:30 ET. We will host an IRC chat all about the wiki. To join, hop onto irc.freenode.net #okfn. IRC is a free text-based chat service.

4. OkFestival

OKFestival is coming soon. You told us that events is one of the biggest ways that you feel connected to Open Knowledge. As you many know, there are regular online meetups for School of Data, CKAN and OpenSpending Communities. Events connect and converge all of us with location and ideas.

Are you planning your own events where you live or on a particular open topic? We can help in a few ways:

  • Let us know about the events you’re running! Let’s discover together how many people are joining Open knowledge events all around the world!
  • Never organized an event before or curious to try a new type of gathering? Check out our Events Handbook for tips and tricks and contact our Events Team if you have questions or feedback about it
  • Want to connect with other community members to talk about your events, share skills, create international series of events together? Ping our global mailing list!

Have some ideas on how we can bring on the happy more? Drop us a line on the okfn-discuss mailing list or reach out directly – heather DOT leson AT okfn DOT org.

(Photo by SpaceAgeBoy)

James Cook University, Library Tech: Knowledge Unlatched - Open Access for all, funded by libraries

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 10:53
We've become a charter member of the 'Knowledge Unlatched' scheme/project/pilot along with over half of Australian university  libraries (we finally beat New Zealand at something. Just.). Basically it's an attempt to pay publishers for book production to make items open access (via Creative Commons licensing).  The FAQ explains the what, why, how, who, when.  The site says the items will be

James Cook University, Library Tech: Knowledge Unlatched - Open Access for all, funded by libraries

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 10:53
We've become a charter member of the 'Knowledge Unlatched' scheme/project/pilot along with over half of Australian university  libraries (we finally beat New Zealand at something. Just.). Basically it's an attempt to pay publishers for book production to make items open access (via Creative Commons licensing).  The FAQ explains the what, why, how, who, when.  The site says the items will be

Open Knowledge Foundation: How many people are rocking Open Knowledge events around the world? Let us know!

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 10:22

We’re getting to know each other more every day on mailing lists and through surveys, we know that plenty of you populate and build groundbreaking projects and communities through our network of 42 local groups, 20 working groups, infinite number of projects and beyond. Now, we’d like to know more about your Open Knowledge events (what can be called such a thing? Have look here) and in particular how many people join them! We want our gathering community to grow and want to know and understand how it grows so how we can best support its sustainable development.

Call for action: let’s discover how many people love Open Knowledge events!

Step 1

When you run an Open Knowledge event, submit an article about it to the Open Knowledge Community Stories Tumblr. Your article can be short and sweet but should at least tell about:

  • what / where / how (topic, offline or online location, format, goals)
  • how many people attended – lets see how Open Kowledge is growing all around the world!
  • outcomes and / or upcoming plans for the future

In addition to that, anything you’d like to add – pictures, quotes and links to post-event reports by attendees of the event, graphs – is very welcome and much appreciated!

Step 2

At the end of each month we’ll write a crowded wrap-up blogpost about all the Open Knowledge events which took place in the previous weeks, to be published on the main Open Knowledge blog, and we’ll know how many people around the world are taking action gathering together to build the future of Open Knowledge.

Do you have an event in the pipeline in April? Run it, have fun!, and report it on the Tumblr by the end of April – it’ll be featured on our first wrap-up post to be published in early May!

Open Knowledge Foundation: How many people are rocking Open Knowledge events around the world? Let us know!

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 10:22

We’re getting to know each other more every day on mailing lists and through surveys, we know that plenty of you populate and build groundbreaking projects and communities through our network of 42 local groups, 20 working groups, infinite number of projects and beyond. Now, we’d like to know more about your Open Knowledge events (what can be called such a thing? Have look here) and in particular how many people join them! We want our gathering community to grow and want to know and understand how it grows so how we can best support its sustainable development.

Call for action: let’s discover how many people love Open Knowledge events!

Step 1

When you run an Open Knowledge event, submit an article about it to the Open Knowledge Community Stories Tumblr. Your article can be short and sweet but should at least tell about:

  • what / where / how (topic, offline or online location, format, goals)
  • how many people attended – lets see how Open Kowledge is growing all around the world!
  • outcomes and / or upcoming plans for the future

In addition to that, anything you’d like to add – pictures, quotes and links to post-event reports by attendees of the event, graphs – is very welcome and much appreciated!

Step 2

At the end of each month we’ll write a crowded wrap-up blogpost about all the Open Knowledge events which took place in the previous weeks, to be published on the main Open Knowledge blog, and we’ll know how many people around the world are taking action gathering together to build the future of Open Knowledge.

Do you have an event in the pipeline in April? Run it, have fun!, and report it on the Tumblr by the end of April – it’ll be featured on our first wrap-up post to be published in early May!

Hellman, Eric: Library Group to Acquire Readmill Assets

planet code4lib - Tue, 2014-04-01 01:26
uixoticTechcrunch is reporting that a group of librarians known as the "ALA ThinkTank" has acquired the assets of shuttered startup Readmill. The new owners will turn the website and apps into a "library books in the cloud" site for library patrons.

Over the weekend, Readmill announced that it had been "acqui-hired" by cloud storage startup DropBox, and that its app and website would cease functioning on July 1. "Many challenges in the world of ebooks remain unsolved, and we failed to create a sustainable platform for reading" said Readmill founder Henrik Berggren, in his farewell message to site members. "Failure to have a sustainable platform for reading really resonates with librarians" responded ThinkTank co-founder J.P. Porcaro. "It's a match made in heaven - devoted users, quixotic economics, and lots of books to distract the staff." Porcaro will serve as CEO of the new incarnation of Readmill.

New Readmill CEO J. P. PorcaroThe acquisition also solves a problem Porcaro had been wrestling with- how to spend the group's Bitcoin millions. Far from its present incarnation as a Social Enterprise/Facebook Group hybrid, ALA ThinkTank originated as a solution for housing destitute librarians from New Jersey during the bi-annual conventions of the American Library Association. The group figured that by renting a house instead of renting hotel rooms, they could save money, learn from peers and throw great parties. The accompanying off-the-grid commerce in "assets" was never intended- it just sort of happened.

One of the librarians was friends with Penn State grad student Ross Ulbricht, who convinced the group to use Bitcoin for the purchase and sale of beer, pizza and "ebooks". "He kept talking about  piracy and medieval trade routes" reported Porcaro, "We thought he was normal ... though in retrospect it was kinda weird when he asked about using hitmen to collect overdue book fines."

The 10,000 fold increase in the value of ThinkTank's Bitcoin account over the past four years caught almost everyone completely off guard. The parties, which in past years were low rent, jeans-and-cardigan affairs, have morphed into multi-story "party hearty" extravaganzas packed with hipster librarians body-pierced with bitcoin encrusted baubles and wearing precious-metal badge ribbons.

Porcaro expects that Readmill's usage will skyrocket with the new management. He thinks that ALA ThinkTank's heady mix of critical pedagogy, "weeding" advice, gaming makerspaces, drink-porn, management theory, gender angst and a whiff of scandal are sure to "make it happen" for the moribund social reading site, which has suffered from the general boringness of books.

ThinkTank members are already hard at work planning the transition. A 13-step procedure that will allow Readmill users to keep their books exactly as they are has been spec-ed out by one library vendor. "If you like your ebooks you can keep them" Porcaro assured me. "If you don't like them, we can send them to India for you. Or Lafourche, Louisiana, your choice."

The backlash against the new Readmill has already begun. "Library books in the cloud is the dumbest thing I've ever heard of. How will people know which bits are theirs, and which need to be returned? How will we do inter-library loan? What will happen if it rains?" complained one senior library director who declined to be identified. "How will we get our books returned then?" she asked. "I don't even know HOW to hire a hitman."

In a press release, Scott Turow, past president of the Authors Guild, expressed his horror at the idea of "library books in the cloud." "Once again, librarians are scheming to take food out of the mouths of authors emaciated by hunger. These poor authors are dying miserable deaths, knowing that their copyrighted works are being misused and unread in this way. Library books in a cloud of nerve gas, more like!"

The American Library Association, which is completely unaffiliated with ALA ThinkTank, has formed a committee to study the cloud library ebook phenomenon.

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