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DuraSpace News: Northeast Fedora User Group Meeting at Yale, May 11-12

planet code4lib - Tue, 2015-03-17 00:00

From Michael Friscia, Manager, Digital Library Programming, Yale University Library

LITA: 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award goes to David Walker

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 21:04

David Walker has been named the winner of the 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Outstanding Communication in Library and Information Technology.

Emerald Group Publishing, and, the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) sponsor the award that recognizes outstanding individuals or institutions for their long-term contributions in the area of Library and Information Science technology and its application.

Walker is being recognized for his dedication and commitment in developing open source library portal application Xerxes over the past decade. Originally designed as an improved interface to the Ex Libris Metalib federated search system in 2004, Xerxes now supports a variety of back-end search engines, including commercial library discovery systems, such as Primo, EDS, Summon, non-cost web service (EBSCO Integration Toolkit, Worldcat API), and other search engines (Solr, Google Appliance). Through this effort, Walker has worked with a variety of vendors to develop and test their application programming interfaces, and has been recognized by OCLC and Ex Libris for innovative uses of their services. In 2007 Walker released the system under an open source license, and today, Xerxes platform is implemented by over 40 institutions around the globe, with some also contributing code back to the project.

Walker says, “These days, academic libraries are increasingly opting for hosted discovery systems and library services platforms. It’s still vitally important that libraries retain responsibility for the interfaces we present users, and explore new and creative ways to integrate library content and services into learning management systems and other online spaces, which cannot be easily achieved by vendor discovery systems or services platforms. Xerxes continues to provide a flexible and open source platform to explore such projects, regardless of the underlying discovery system or library services platform.”

Currently, Walker serves as Director of Systemwide Digital Library Services at the California State University (CSU), Office of the Chancellor. In this capacity, he oversees a systemwide discovery system, link resolver, and institutional repository service for all 23 CSU campuses. His recent work has focused on moving the CSU libraries from a disparate and disconnected set of local ILS and ERM systems toward a consortium library services platform, as well as exploring integration of library systems and services with learning management systems.

Walker received his MLIS from UCLA. As a librarian, programmer, and interface designer, he has led and contributed to a number of open source initiatives in the library community, including developing scripts, plugins, and interface designs for the SFX link resolver, Innovative ILS systems, and other library services.

The Library and Information Technology Association and Emerald, the publisher of Library Hi Tech, are pleased to present the 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award to David Walker for his outstanding contributions to communication in library science and technology. The award will be presented during Sunday Afternoon with LITA on June 28, 2015, at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco.

About LITA

Established in 1966, LITA is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership including systems librarians, library administrators, library technologists, library schools, vendors and many others interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers. For more information about LITA go to www.lita.org, or contact the LITA office by phone, 800-545-2433, ext. 4268; or e-mail: lita@ala.org

About Emerald

Emerald is a global publisher linking research and practice to the benefit of society. The company manages a portfolio of more than 290 journals and over 2,500 books and book series volumes. It also provides an extensive range of value-added products, resources and services to support its customers’ needs. Emerald is COUNTER 4 compliant. Emerald is also a partner of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and works with Portico and the LOCKSS initiative for digital archive preservation. It also works in close collaboration with a number of organizations and associations worldwide.

Question and Comments

Mary Taylor
Executive Director
Library & Information Technology Association (LITA)
(800) 545-2433 ext 4267
mtaylor@ala.org

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part ha

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 21:02

Part ha of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

Cynthia Ng: Using MarcEdit to Populate (Sub)fields Using Data from Fixed Fields

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 20:42
Was supposed to post this last week, but didn’t actually have time. Big thanks to Terry Reese (MarcEdit developer) who helped me over twitter of all things. While not the most complicated, I just couldn’t find any documentation on this, so here it is. Use Case In my case, I wanted to populate the language … Continue reading Using MarcEdit to Populate (Sub)fields Using Data from Fixed Fields

Nicole Engard: Bookmarks for March 16, 2015

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them

  • LINE Free Calls & Messages

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for March 16, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. MarkMail: Mailing List Search
  2. Open Source ILS Survey
  3. Herding Cattle

Nicole Engard: SxSW: Fixing Transportation with Humanity & Technology

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 19:50

Today’s keynote was given by Logan Green, co-founder and CEO of Lyft. Logan spent most of his life growing up in LA surrounded by traffic. The idea for Lyft came to him while in Zimbabwe where community members often car pool to get places. Lyft is currently in 65 cities in the US.

Lyft introduced Magic Mode for SxSW where you might get a ride in a fancy car. Most of the people in the room have tried Lyft (I have not … might have to give it a try next time I go to the airport). Logan started with the story of Lyft. LA (where he grew up) were built around automobiles – whereas older cities are built around people. He got tired of seeing cars around him with 4 empty seats – if people were sharing rides it would help with the traffic problem. He decided to perform an experiment and go without a car for a while and see what options he had.

He was on a transportation board in Santa Barbara for 3 years and tried to fix public transportation – but he didn’t get anywhere. In Zimbabwe there is no public transportation – the government doesn’t provide it at least. The community built it’s own network. People would buy small buses and create route on their own. This city had a better system than Santa Barbara – a much more affluent city. This lead to the creation of Zimride – a web based ride-sharing service – you’d post your route and how many seats you had and what you wanted to charge per seat. The problem was that when people want transportation they want it now – this worked well for college kids looking for a ride home on weekends.

He wanted to make a transportation service that was so good you didn’t need to own a car – and Zimride wasn’t meeting that need. Soon after everyone started to carry around smart phones. This was the birth of Lyft. They decided to do background checks and put all these safeguards in place to make Lyft even safer than getting a taxi. Most importantly – where does the pink mustache come from? They come from Carstache another company that created them – Lyft originally ordered a few for fun for the office. They were looking for a way to show that they didn’t take themselves too seriously and they decided to hand them out to every driver. In the end the drivers actually started using them and were excited to use them. It turned out that the mustaches didn’t weather too well so they had to come up with a new option.

Uber has a different vision for the world. Uber is a car service. Lyft’s vision for the world is to make car ownership unnecessary. They are not trying to make a new taxi cab service. Over 2 trillion dollars are spent on transportation in the US and most of that is on our own personal cars – Lyft is trying to reduce the amount people have to spend on transportation. And of course offer you a better experience. To this goal Lyft introduced Lyft Line which is like a shuttle service but much more convenient.

From the business side of things where is the money going? Why do they have to raise so much money? Logan says it’s expensive to put up 4G towers around the country. For Lyft they want to have drivers be about 3 minutes away. So just like cell companies – Lyft is investing in their network. They are working on both driver and passenger acquisition.

Right now there are hundreds of thousands of drivers on the road for Lyft – even Logan is a driver. There are people who do it 40-50 hours a week to those who are just on their way to work. Logan says that the nature of work is changing – flexibility is the new stability – people are looking for something different in their careers now. In LA 60% of their drivers work in the art industry – so they are using Lyft to fill the gaps in between pursuing their dreams. 30% of the drivers in San Fran are using Lyft to pitch their business to their riders. On the flip side some people feel that they are working a full time job but not getting the benefits of a full time employee. If people are so important to the business then why are drivers contractors instead of full time employees? The main reason is that Lyft needs people quickly and the people need jobs quickly – so the original idea wasn’t to cater to people who were doing this full time. The goal was to be flexible – if you want to ‘flip in to driver mode’ on your way to work you can.

When asked about the allegations of poaching – Logan said that many people drive for both platforms and that’s encouraged and allowed by both Uber and Lyft. Neither platform was set up for exclusivity but Lyft does reward their most loyal drivers. Logan does agree that Uber has been unethical in this area and can’t speak more to it due to law suits.

Lyft is looking to grow internationally this coming year – they don’t have any cities to announce yet though. They aren’t looking to just ‘go’ international – they want to add value – they don’t want to be a taxi service they want to bring their ideals with them.

What role will self driving cars play in Lyft? Right now we’re looking at ‘partial’ self driving cars in the next few years. You still need a human in this case. Self driving cars only make a difference when you don’t need a human in the driver’s seat – and that product is a few more years down the road. When self driving cars come out it’s not just going to change Lyft – it’s going to change the entire transportation industry. In that case most people will probably choose to use a self driving car as a service instead of owning a car.

The post SxSW: Fixing Transportation with Humanity & Technology appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. Self Driving Cars
  2. SxSW: Magical UX and the Internet of Things
  3. SxSW: Al Gore on Climate Change

Nicole Engard: SxSW: Storming the gates of the digital frontier

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 18:15

Another session that’s out of my wheelhouse this afternoon. A panel on breaking in to the film/TV industry by using the tools on the web today like YouTube. On this panel were : Derek Waters, Lauren Francesca, and Anthony Deptula all hosted by Todd Luoto.

Todd talked about the castle that is entertainment. There were people who decided who could come in to the castle – the gatekeeper. Then about 6 or 7 years ago there was a new castle – but it was an nice open beach house – that opened up called Vimeo and YouTube. This is the exciting time we’re living in – where there is a lot of money to be made with content creation without those gatekeepers in the way.

Derek started with how he got started in the industry. He always wanted to be an actor and started creating his own stuff because he got tired of auditioning for small parts in movies. In 2007 he started the Drunk History series. He had sent it around but nothing happened until he shared it on the Internet.

Lauren was up next to explain her start. She started by auditioning for a web series that became very popular and ended up on TV. It wasn’t really until she started doing her own stuff on YouTube that people really started recognizing her.

Anthony’s started in TV at the cable networks. He left that world to create content. He filmed a movie with some friends called ‘One Too Many Mornings” and it was going to be on YouTube rentals – it upset a lot of people that they had to pay for something on YouTube. Now he works at Maker Studios pulling data together to figure out how to combine the more traditional medium with the digital.

The new gatekeeper is the audience. Right now it seems like the audience is looking for ‘unboxing’ videos – they get 300-400 million views on these channels. Another trend right now is that a lot of people are on tablets viewing these videos – we might see that there aren’t Saturday morning cartoons anymore and instead kids are looking for their shows on their tablet on YouTube.

Lauren things that collaboration is key to have a successful video channel. You also have to think about what’s happening around you – doing sketches for specific holidays or something that’s trending on social networks. It means that you have to always be on board with doing something funny in conjunction with the news. Lauren says that her fans are her gatekeepers. She has to be careful to appeal to her audience which right now seems to be 12-35 year old boys – so they get upset if she does a video on unboxing a make-up product or something of that nature.

Derek was worried that moving to Comedy Central would make him lose what made him popular in the first place – but he was able to keep the content the same and have that control still even in the new space.

Todd asks if the speakers feel that YouTube is a training ground for traditional media – and Anthony replied by saying that it is not. People are doing amazing work – professional work on YouTube.

Lauren cautions that you need to leave a budget for marketing if you’re going to create a web series. There is so much content out there that if people have to filter through it all to find your stuff. Promoting your content is a full time job whereas the recording might take you a week. She suggests using YouTube as a way to break in to the industry because as Anthony said it’s a lot easier to send a link to an executive’s email address than it is to get them to watch your DVD. Short videos are the key. Derek encourages everyone to do their own stuff first.

Derek can’t remember the last DVD he bought – but he does know that almost everyone has a device they can watch media on. His transition from digital to being on Comedy Central. With the digital it was all about ‘no money’ – and he loved that. Now it’s hard to explain to a professional costume person that you want to wear converse sneakers in a historical sketch – but it’s great to have those professionals and those resources.

Lauren thinks that it’s foolish for an actor to not have a YouTube channel these days – but don’t just throw things out there – make them as good as possible – focus on your craft. Once it’s out there it’s always out there and the executives are looking.

The post SxSW: Storming the gates of the digital frontier appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. NYLA: Leadership on the Digital Frontier
  2. SxSW: Behind the Social at WGBH
  3. SxSW: A New Generation: Creativity and Open Source

District Dispatch: Library leaders: Comment on the IRS Tax Form Program

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 17:31

Photo by John Morgan via Flickr

Last week, the American Library Association (ALA) Washington Office hosted a conference call with several Internal Revenue Service (IRS) officials to issues surrounding the distribution of the 2014 fiscal year tax forms and instruction publications to libraries. Nearly 100 library leaders participated in the call.

Patricia Evans, director of IRS distribution, began by apologizing for the poor communications about the changes the IRS intended to initiate to begin cutting back on paper publications. But when her staff tried to adjust available materials to send more forms and instruction publications to public libraries participating in the Tax Forms Outlet Program (TFOP), Congress cut their budget by $300 million. Now, there is less funding that can be used to distribute publications to libraries.

We need some volunteers to work with the IRS to make plans of how the TFOP program and publication distribution for libraries will work.

L’Tanya Brooks, director of Media and Publications and she asked librarians on the call what they would suggest the IRS do going forward. Many librarians shared their ideas of how they were addressing this issue; from printing forms themselves to putting an RFID tag on instruction booklets for use only as a research tool in the library, which would prevent patrons from taking the forms home.

Dietra Grant is the director of Stakeholder Partnerships, Education and Communication (SPEC) and she wants the IRS to do better going forward. She has asked Carol Quiller, IRS senior tax analyst, to manage a unique relationship with libraries. Quiller will work with librarians to decide how to best use the IRS’ dwindling resources. The leadership of the IRS is committed to moving all tax filers to file online.

Overall, we’ve been successful in making our case that the communication was insufficient and the IRS has agreed to listen to us and design their path forward with our advice. So now, we need some volunteers to work with the IRS to make plans of how the TFOP program and publication distribution for libraries will work.

If you’d like to become a library volunteer or provide feedback on the TFOP program, email Emily Sheketoff, executive director of the ALA Washington Office, at esheketoff@alawash.org.

The post Library leaders: Comment on the IRS Tax Form Program appeared first on District Dispatch.

HangingTogether: OCLC Research Collective Collection Tournament: Round of 32 Bracket Revealed!

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 15:10

We are almost ready for the 2015 OCLC Research Collective Collections Tournament to begin! Here’s the bracket for the Round of 32, where we’ve randomly paired up all 32 conferences for the tournament’s first round competition.

[Click image to enlarge]

Competition will be based on a metric having to do with the contents of the collective collections – for example, it might be which conference has the most/highest/largest “something” in their collection. In the interest of fairness to all entrants in the Bracket Competition, we will not reveal the metric for the first round until after the entry period closes on March 19 (see below). Otherwise, those who enter after the metric is revealed would be able to take this into account when making their conference choice, while those who entered earlier would not.

Speaking of the Bracket Competition, THERE IS STILL TIME TO ENTER!!! Read the Official Rules, choose your favorite conference, and enter by 5 PM Eastern time, Thursday, March 19, 2015. You could win a fabulous prize!

Results of the first round competition will be posted on Friday, March 20.

About Brian Lavoie

Brian Lavoie is a Research Scientist in OCLC Research. Brian's research interests include collective collections, the system-wide organization of library resources, and digital preservation.

Mail | Web | LinkedIn | More Posts (8)

Library of Congress: The Signal: Reaching Out and Moving Forward: Revising the Library of Congress’ Recommended Format Specifications

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 14:11

The following post is by Ted Westervelt, head of acquisitions and cataloging for U.S. Serials in the Arts, Humanities & Sciences section at the Library of Congress.

Nine months ago, the Library of Congress released its Recommended Format Specifications. This was the result of years of work by experts from across the institution, bringing their own specialized knowledge in the needs and expectations of our patrons, developments in publishing and production and the technical aspects of creation, presentation and distribution. The Library of Congress invested so much effort in this because it is essential to the mission of the institution.

The Library seeks to acquire both broadly and deeply, collecting works from almost every subject area and from every country on earth. This forms one of the world’s foremost collections of creative works and one which the Library is committed to making available to its patrons now and for generations to come. In order to accomplish this, the Library must be able to differentiate between the physical and technical characteristics which will aid it in this effort and those which will have to be overcome to fulfill this goal.

With the Recommended Format Specifications, the Library created hierarchies of these characteristics, such as file formats, in order to provide some guidance. By using the Specifications, staff in the Library can determine the level of effort involved in managing and maintaining content which he or she might want to acquire for the collection and use this knowledge to make an informed judgment about his or her actions. In a time of limited funds and unlimited creation, acting strategically in this manner is essential for an institution like the Library of Congress.

Beyond the Books from user difei on Flickr.

It is not merely the Library of Congress which might benefit from something like the Recommended Format Specifications. The fundamental interest of the Library in creative works is to ensure that those it adds to its collection will last and remain accessible to patrons well into the future. Yet the identification of the characteristics which encourage preservation and long-term access are not ones which are of value to the Library of Congress alone. Creators of these works want their creations to last; distributors and vendors want to ensure that the content they are sharing will remain available to their customers long after it is sent to them and remains available for distribution to future customers.

Libraries and other archiving institutions need works which will last in order to fulfill their charges. So the Library of Congress has attempted to make the Recommended Format Specifications as useful and available as possible for these other participants in the life cycle of creative works. The process of creating the Specifications naturally came from the perspective of the Library of Congress, which has a rather unique role. However, the work which went into the Specifications was not sealed within an ivory tower.

The experts who developed the hierarchies knew that developing guidance which did not have the potential for broad application could not be successful. So they looked at the issue of preservation and long-term access as holistically as possible. Naturally, these teams of experts started with established Library of Congress guidance and documentation, such as the Best Edition Statement (PDF) and the Sustainability of Digital Formats; but they also consulted the recommendations of external groups such as the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archivists and the Audio Engineering Society.

Not only did the teams engage with the deep bench of expertise within the Library of Congress, but they took full advantage of experts from outside it as well. As much as the Specifications have to meet the needs of the Library specifically, the basic criteria which informed them were ones which are universally applicable: adoption, transparency, superior technical characteristics, coordination with international standards. The Recommended Format Specifications were written with the broader community in mind. And happily, the broader community has shown a real interest in the Specifications.

World Airline Routes from user josullivan59 on Flickr.

As we have shared them through listservs, articles, blog posts and presentations at various conferences, there has been a great deal on interest expressed in the Specifications. The Library has received comments and feedback from individuals and institutions as far afield as Germany and New Zealand. And we continue to disseminate the Specifications, not to enforce others to do things exactly as the Library of Congress does them; but to help them address the same issues we all face and hopefully help their efforts in overcoming these obstacles at least somewhat easier.

The Library does however seek a rather more tangible goal from the sharing of the Recommended Format Specifications with other stakeholders around the world. There is a real temptation, when accomplishing something like the Recommended Format Specifications, something which took years of effort on the part of many dedicated individuals, and that temptation is to lay down one’s tools and be satisfied with a job well done. And there is no denying that the Library considers the Recommended Format Specifications a job well done and rightfully so.

However, the nature of creative works, especially digital creative works, does not allow us to rest on our laurels. What might be the preferred format for a digital photograph or an eBook today might not be the preferred format tomorrow. Unless we keep reviewing the landscape and the ongoing developments in the world of digital creation, the Specifications will soon be as useful as a map liberally dotted with the phrase ‘here be dragons’.

Thar Be Dragons!!! by user eskimo_jo on Flickr.

The teams of experts within the Library are already looking back at the Specifications, identifying places in which they want to revise, update, tighten and improve them. And we are engaged in further investigation of potential additions to the Specifications. Currently, experts at the Library of Congress are working with colleagues at the National Archives and Records Administration, exploring the potential value of the SIARD format developed by the Swiss Federal Archives as a means of preserving relational databases. So there is more to sharing the Specifications with others than just in providing those others with an opportunity to take advantage of them; it also gives us a chance to learn more about what might make the Specifications better.

The Library of Congress has committed to a sustained investment in the Recommended Format Specifications, which means an annual review and revision process. And to accomplish this, it is actively soliciting feedback and comments from any and all who can help us make them better and more useful, for ourselves and to all of our stakeholders and colleagues in the creative world. This feedback is requested by March 31st, after which date our teams of experts will take the input we have received from others and the results of our own investigations to spend the next three months developing a revised version of the Recommended Format Specifications for the coming year. The greater the input, the better the product, so please do not hesitate to contact us here to share your thoughts and ideas about the Recommended Format Specifications.

Library of Congress: The Signal: Reaching Out and Moving Forward: Revising the Library of Congress’ Recommended Format Specifications

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 14:11

The following post is by Ted Westervelt, head of acquisitions and cataloging for U.S. Serials in the Arts, Humanities & Sciences section at the Library of Congress.

Nine months ago, the Library of Congress released its Recommended Format Specifications. This was the result of years of work by experts from across the institution, bringing their own specialized knowledge in the needs and expectations of our patrons, developments in publishing and production and the technical aspects of creation, presentation and distribution. The Library of Congress invested so much effort in this because it is essential to the mission of the institution.

The Library seeks to acquire both broadly and deeply, collecting works from almost every subject area and from every country on earth. This forms one of the world’s foremost collections of creative works and one which the Library is committed to making available to its patrons now and for generations to come. In order to accomplish this, the Library must be able to differentiate between the physical and technical characteristics which will aid it in this effort and those which will have to be overcome to fulfill this goal.

With the Recommended Format Specifications, the Library created hierarchies of these characteristics, such as file formats, in order to provide some guidance. By using the Specifications, staff in the Library can determine the level of effort involved in managing and maintaining content which he or she might want to acquire for the collection and use this knowledge to make an informed judgment about his or her actions. In a time of limited funds and unlimited creation, acting strategically in this manner is essential for an institution like the Library of Congress.

Beyond the Books from user difei on Flickr.

It is not merely the Library of Congress which might benefit from something like the Recommended Format Specifications. The fundamental interest of the Library in creative works is to ensure that those it adds to its collection will last and remain accessible to patrons well into the future. Yet the identification of the characteristics which encourage preservation and long-term access are not ones which are of value to the Library of Congress alone. Creators of these works want their creations to last; distributors and vendors want to ensure that the content they are sharing will remain available to their customers long after it is sent to them and remains available for distribution to future customers.

Libraries and other archiving institutions need works which will last in order to fulfill their charges. So the Library of Congress has attempted to make the Recommended Format Specifications as useful and available as possible for these other participants in the life cycle of creative works. The process of creating the Specifications naturally came from the perspective of the Library of Congress, which has a rather unique role. However, the work which went into the Specifications was not sealed within an ivory tower.

The experts who developed the hierarchies knew that developing guidance which did not have the potential for broad application could not be successful. So they looked at the issue of preservation and long-term access as holistically as possible. Naturally, these teams of experts started with established Library of Congress guidance and documentation, such as the Best Edition Statement (PDF) and the Sustainability of Digital Formats; but they also consulted the recommendations of external groups such as the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archivists and the Audio Engineering Society.

Not only did the teams engage with the deep bench of expertise within the Library of Congress, but they took full advantage of experts from outside it as well. As much as the Specifications have to meet the needs of the Library specifically, the basic criteria which informed them were ones which are universally applicable: adoption, transparency, superior technical characteristics, coordination with international standards. The Recommended Format Specifications were written with the broader community in mind. And happily, the broader community has shown a real interest in the Specifications.

World Airline Routes from user josullivan59 on Flickr.

As we have shared them through listservs, articles, blog posts and presentations at various conferences, there has been a great deal on interest expressed in the Specifications. The Library has received comments and feedback from individuals and institutions as far afield as Germany and New Zealand. And we continue to disseminate the Specifications, not to enforce others to do things exactly as the Library of Congress does them; but to help them address the same issues we all face and hopefully help their efforts in overcoming these obstacles at least somewhat easier.

The Library does however seek a rather more tangible goal from the sharing of the Recommended Format Specifications with other stakeholders around the world. There is a real temptation, when accomplishing something like the Recommended Format Specifications, something which took years of effort on the part of many dedicated individuals, and that temptation is to lay down one’s tools and be satisfied with a job well done. And there is no denying that the Library considers the Recommended Format Specifications a job well done and rightfully so.

However, the nature of creative works, especially digital creative works, does not allow us to rest on our laurels. What might be the preferred format for a digital photograph or an eBook today might not be the preferred format tomorrow. Unless we keep reviewing the landscape and the ongoing developments in the world of digital creation, the Specifications will soon be as useful as a map liberally dotted with the phrase ‘here be dragons’.

Thar Be Dragons!!! by user eskimo_jo on Flickr.

The teams of experts within the Library are already looking back at the Specifications, identifying places in which they want to revise, update, tighten and improve them. And we are engaged in further investigation of potential additions to the Specifications. Currently, experts at the Library of Congress are working with colleagues at the National Archives and Records Administration, exploring the potential value of the SIARD format developed by the Swiss Federal Archives as a means of preserving relational databases. So there is more to sharing the Specifications with others than just in providing those others with an opportunity to take advantage of them; it also gives us a chance to learn more about what might make the Specifications better.

The Library of Congress has committed to a sustained investment in the Recommended Format Specifications, which means an annual review and revision process. And to accomplish this, it is actively soliciting feedback and comments from any and all who can help us make them better and more useful, for ourselves and to all of our stakeholders and colleagues in the creative world. This feedback is requested by March 31st, after which date our teams of experts will take the input we have received from others and the results of our own investigations to spend the next three months developing a revised version of the Recommended Format Specifications for the coming year. The greater the input, the better the product, so please do not hesitate to contact us here to share your thoughts and ideas about the Recommended Format Specifications.

D-Lib: Reconstructing the Past Through Utah Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps: A Geospatial Approach to Library Resources

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Justin B. Sorensen, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah

D-Lib: A French-German Survey of Electronic Theses and Dissertations: Access and Restrictions

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Joachim Schopfel, GERiiCO Laboratory, University of Lille 3, France; Helene Prost, National Center for Scientific Research, France; Marjorie Piotrowski, University of Lille 3, France; Eberhard R. Hilf, Institute for Scientific Networking, Germany; Thomas Severiens, Institute for Scientific Networking, Germany; Paul Grabbe, Institute for Scientific Networking, Germany

D-Lib: Development of Linked Data for Archives in Korea

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Ok Nam Park, Sangmyung University, Republic of Korea

D-Lib: Storage is a Strategic Issue: Digital Preservation in the Cloud

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Gillian Oliver, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; Steve Knight, National Library of New Zealand

D-Lib: OpenDOAR Repositories and Metadata Practices

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Heather Lea Moulaison, Felicity Dykas and Kristen Gallant, University of Missouri

D-Lib: Tools for Discovering and Archiving the Mobile Web

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Frank McCown, Monica Yarbrough and Keith Enlow, Harding University

D-Lib: Trustworthiness: Self-assessment of an Institutional Repository against ISO 16363-2012

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Bernadette Houghton, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia

D-Lib: Digital Library Research in Action: Supporting Information Retrieval in Sowiport

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Article by Daniel Hienert, Frank Sawitzki and Philipp Mayr, GESIS, Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

D-Lib: The Practice of Digital Libraries

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-03-16 11:14
Editorial by Laurence Lannom, CNRI

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