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Information Technology and Libraries: A Library in the Palm of Your Hand: Mobile Services in Top 100 University Libraries

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-06-15 04:00
What is the current state of mobile services among academic libraries of the country’s top 100 universities, and what are the best practices for librarians implementing mobile services at the university level? Through in-depth website visits and survey questionnaires, the authors studied each of the top 100 universities’ libraries’ experiences with mobile services. Results showed that all of these libraries offered at least one mobile service, and the majority offered multiple services. The most common mobile services offered were mobile sites, text messaging services, e-books, and mobile access to databases and the catalog. In addition, chat/IM services, social media accounts and apps were very popular.  Survey responses also indicated a trend towards responsive design for websites so that patrons can access the library’s full site on any mobile device. Respondents recommend that libraries considering offering mobile services begin as soon as possible as patron demand for these services is expected to increase.

Information Technology and Libraries: What’s in a word? : Rethinking facet headings in a discovery service

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-06-15 04:00

The emergence of Discovery systems has been well received by libraries who have long been concerned with offering a smorgasbord of databases that require either individual searching of databases or the problematic use of federated searching.  The ability to search across a wide array of subscribed and open-access information resources via a centralized index has opened up access for users to a library’s wealth of information resources.  This capability has been particularly praised for its ‘google like’ search interface, thereby conforming to user expectations for information searching.  Yet, all discovery services also include facets as a search capability and thus provide faceted navigation which is a search feature that Google is not particularly well suited for.  Discovery services thus provide a hybrid search interface.  An examination of e-commerce sites clearly shows that faceted navigation is an integral part of their discovery systems.  Many library OPACs also now are being developed with faceted navigation capabilities.  However, the discovery services faceted structures suffer from a number of problems which inhibit their usefulness and their potential.  This article examines a number of these issues and it offers suggestions for improving the discovery search interface.  It also argues that vendors and libraries need to work together to more closely analyze the user experience of the discovery system.

 

DuraSpace News: The DSpace Technology Roadmap at OR2015

planet code4lib - Mon, 2015-06-15 00:00

Winchester, MA  At last week's Open Repositories Conference Tim Donohue, DSpace Technical Lead, presented the DSpace Technology Roadmap for 2015-2016 on behalf of Roadmap Working Group members:

• Tim Donohue, DuraSpace

• Stuart Lewis, University of Edinburgh

• Lievan Droogmans, @mire

• Jonathan Markow, DuraSpace

• Michele Mennielli, CINECA

• Richard Rodgers, Massachusettes Institute of Technology

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part dd

planet code4lib - Sun, 2015-06-14 18:56

Part dd of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

William Denton: Spectacles and standards

planet code4lib - Sun, 2015-06-14 13:15

Two or three years ago I bought “vintage” (i.e. “used”) eyeglasses from Gadabout way out east on Queen here in Toronto. I took them to Josephson Opticians and had my new prescription put in and everything worked very well … until the left temple began to get wiggly in the middle and eventually broke in two.

A problem in the temple.

I tried tape and glue, but nothing held it together, so I took the glasses back into Josephson to see what they could do. They said they couldn’t weld it—the metal was too thin and that never worked for temples—but they could just order in new temples. The glasses were old, so they used standard parts, and those parts were still available.

It turns out that eyeglasses all used to use standard parts—the frames and design would be different, but the temples and nose pads and hinges and such all had common sizes and screws and could be swapped in or replaced. In Canada today the place to get those parts is McCray Optical Supply, which sells cable temples coloured gold and silver in the common 105 mm length.

New eyeglasses all have different parts. Each manufacturer makes their own hinges and nose pads and you can’t move a piece from one pair over to another’s. When you get glasses now, you’re buying into a closed, proprietary system. The user freedom that came from open standards and open hardware is gone.

I’m happy my eyeglasses are part of the older open spectacle world. The new temples fitted and the glasses are back in action.

Fixed!

Galen Charlton: Desiderata for the next Librarian of Congress

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 20:52

The current Librarian of Congress, James Billington, has announced that he will retire on 1 January 2016.  I wish him well – but I also think it’s past time for a change at LC.  Here are my thoughts on how that change should be embodied by Billington’s successor.

The next Librarian of Congress should embrace a vision of LC as the general national library of the United States and advocate for it being funded accordingly.  At present LC’s mission is expressed as:

The Library’s mission is to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties and to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.

Of course, Congress should continue to have access to the best research resources available, and I think it important that LC qua research library remain grounded by serving that unique patron population – but LC’s mission should emphasize its services to everybody who find themselves in the U.S.:

The Library’s mission is to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people, present and future, and to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties.

Having LC be unapologetically and completely committed to being a national library first is risky.  For one thing, it means asking for more funding in a political climate that does not encourage such requests. By removing the fallback excuse of “LC is ultimately just Congress’ research library”, it also means that LC perforce cannot not evade its leadership responsibilities in the national and international library communities.

However, there are opportunities for a Library of Congress that sees its patron base as consisting of all who find themselves on U.S soil: even broader support than it enjoys now and the ability to act as a library of last resort when other institutions fail our memory.

The next Librarian of Congress should be willing and able to put LC’s technology programs back on track. This does not require that the next Librarian be a technologist. It certainly doesn’t require that they be uncritically enthusiastic about technology – but they must be informed, able to pick a good CIO, and able to see past puffery to envision where and how technology can support LC’s mission.

In particular, research and development in library and information technology is an area where the Library of Congress is uniquely able to marshal federal government resources, both to support its own collections and to provide tools that other libraries can use and build upon.

I wonder what the past 20 years or so would have been like if LC had considered technology and R&D worthy of strong leadership and investment. Would Linked Open Data – or even something better – have taken off ten years ago? Would there be more clarity in library software? What would have things been like had LC technologists been more free to experiment and take risks?

I hope that LC under Billington’s successor will give us a taste of what could have been, then surpass it.

The next Librarian of Congress should be a trained librarian or archivist. This isn’t about credentials per se – see Daniel Ransom piece on the “Real Librarians” of Congress – although possession of an MLS or an archivists’ certificate wouldn’t hurt.  Rather, I’d like to see candidates who are already participating in the professional discourse and who have informed opinions on library technology and libraries as community nuclei (and let’s shoot for the moon: who can speak intelligently on metadata issues!).

Of possibly more import: I hope to see candidates who embody library values, and who will help LC to resist the enclosure of the information commons.

What I would prefer not to see is the appointment of somebody whose sole professional credential is an MBA: the Library of Congress is not just another business to be run by a creature of the cult of the gormless general-purpose manager.  I think it would also be a mistake to appoint somebody who is only a scholar, no matter how distinguished: unlike the Poet Laureate, the Librarian of Congress has to see to the running of a large organization.

Finally, the next Librarian of Congress should not attain that position via the glass elevator.  There are plenty of folks who are not white men who can meet all of my desiderata – or any other reasonable set of desiderata short of walking on water – and I hope that the President will keep the demographics of the library profession (and those we serve!) in mind when making a choice.

Galen Charlton: Desiderata for the next Librarian of Congress

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 20:52

The current Librarian of Congress, James Billington, has announced that he will retire on 1 January 2016.  I wish him well – but I also think it’s past time for a change at LC.  Here are my thoughts on how that change should be embodied by Billington’s successor.

The next Librarian of Congress should embrace a vision of LC as the general national library of the United States and advocate for it being funded accordingly.  At present LC’s mission is expressed as:

The Library’s mission is to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties and to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.

Of course, Congress should continue to have access to the best research resources available, and I think it important that LC qua research library remain grounded by serving that unique patron population – but LC’s mission should emphasize its services to everybody who find themselves in the U.S.:

The Library’s mission is to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people, present and future, and to support the Congress in fulfilling its constitutional duties.

Having LC be unapologetically and completely committed to being a national library first is risky.  For one thing, it means asking for more funding in a political climate that does not encourage such requests. By removing the fallback excuse of “LC is ultimately just Congress’ research library”, it also means that LC perforce cannot not evade its leadership responsibilities in the national and international library communities.

However, there are opportunities for a Library of Congress that sees its patron base as consisting of all who find themselves on U.S soil: even broader support than it enjoys now and the ability to act as a library of last resort when other institutions fail our memory.

The next Librarian of Congress should be willing and able to put LC’s technology programs back on track. This does not require that the next Librarian be a technologist. It certainly doesn’t require that they be uncritically enthusiastic about technology – but they must be informed, able to pick a good CIO, and able to see past puffery to envision where and how technology can support LC’s mission.

In particular, research and development in library and information technology is an area where the Library of Congress is uniquely able to marshal federal government resources, both to support its own collections and to provide tools that other libraries can use and build upon.

I wonder what the past 20 years or so would have been like if LC had considered technology and R&D worthy of strong leadership and investment. Would Linked Open Data – or even something better – have taken off ten years ago? Would there be more clarity in library software? What would have things been like had LC technologists been more free to experiment and take risks?

I hope that LC under Billington’s successor will give us a taste of what could have been, then surpass it.

The next Librarian of Congress should be a trained librarian or archivist. This isn’t about credentials per se – see Daniel Ransom piece on the “Real Librarians” of Congress – although possession of an MLS or an archivists’ certificate wouldn’t hurt.  Rather, I’d like to see candidates who are already participating in the professional discourse and who have informed opinions on library technology and libraries as community nuclei (and let’s shoot for the moon: who can speak intelligently on metadata issues!).

Of possibly more import: I hope to see candidates who embody library values, and who will help LC to resist the enclosure of the information commons.

What I would prefer not to see is the appointment of somebody whose sole professional credential is an MBA: the Library of Congress is not just another business to be run by a creature of the cult of the gormless general-purpose manager.  I think it would also be a mistake to appoint somebody who is only a scholar, no matter how distinguished: unlike the Poet Laureate, the Librarian of Congress has to see to the running of a large organization.

Finally, the next Librarian of Congress should not attain that position via the glass elevator.  There are plenty of folks who are not white men who can meet all of my desiderata – or any other reasonable set of desiderata short of walking on water – and I hope that the President will keep the demographics of the library profession (and those we serve!) in mind when making a choice.

Nicole Engard: Bookmarks for June 13, 2015

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious.

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for June 13, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. Not a Librarian
  2. Library Science Journals w/ RSS
  3. Tracking in house use in Koha 3.4

Nicole Engard: Bookmarks for June 13, 2015

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 20:30

Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious.

Digest powered by RSS Digest

The post Bookmarks for June 13, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today....

Related posts:

  1. Not a Librarian
  2. Library Science Journals w/ RSS
  3. Tracking in house use in Koha 3.4

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part em

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 15:25

Part em of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part em

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 15:25

Part em of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

Ranti Junus: The Story of the Chinese Farmer

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 15:16

“You’ll never know what would be the consequences of misfortune. Or, you’ll never know what would be the consequences of good fortune.” — Alan Watts

Patrick Hochstenbach: Homework assignment #4 Sketchbookskool #BootKamp

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 12:29
Filed under: Sketchbook Tagged: art, cartoon, comic, history, personalhistory, sketch, sketchbook, sketchbookskool, urbansketching

Patrick Hochstenbach: Homework assignment #3 Sketchbookskool #BootKamp

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 12:27
Filed under: Sketchbook Tagged: brushpen, calvinandhobbes, cartoon, comic, doodle, sketch, sketchbook, sketchbookskool, watterson

Patrick Hochstenbach: Homework assignment #2 Sketchbookskool #BootKamp

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 12:25
Filed under: Sketchbook Tagged: brushpen, copic, money, sketch, sketchbook, sketchbookskool, watercolor

Patrick Hochstenbach: Homework assignment #1 Sketchbookskool #BootKamp

planet code4lib - Sat, 2015-06-13 12:23
Filed under: Sketchbook Tagged: apple, copic, moleskine, sketch, sketchbook, sketchbookskool, watercolor

District Dispatch: Library youth and tech leaders on the Hill: We build a bridge between knowledge and passion

planet code4lib - Fri, 2015-06-12 20:44

Participants in ALA’s June 2015 Capitol Hill event on youth and technology. Left to right: Nicola McDonald, Jesse Sanders, Mega Subramaniam, Sari Feldman.

“Libraries are often the sole or primary technological access point for their communities,” said U.S. Representative Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio) yesterday, kicking off a Capitol Hill event exploring the role of libraries in preparing children and teens for higher education and the workforce. In my childhood, “I went to the library every day. It opened up worlds I didn’t even know existed.”

Co-hosted by the American Library Association’s Washington Office and Rep. Fudge’s office, the event, entitled, “Kids, Learning, and Technology: Libraries as 21st Century Creative Spaces,” convened library leaders in the youth and technology space to discuss strategies for advancing digital literacy, critical thinking and creative expression through technology-driven programming and services.

Congresswoman Fudge’s powerful words at the outset of the event set the tone for the panel discussion to follow. Moderated by ALA President-elect and Cuyahoga County (Ohio) Public Library (CCPL) Executive Director Sari Feldman, the discussants included Nicola McDonald of the New York Public Library (NYPL), Jesse Sanders of CCPL’s Warrensville Branch, and Professor Mega Subramaniam of the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies.

Together, the panelists’ remarks painted a picture of the library as an equal-opportunity on-ramp to the technology economy. Nicola McDonald outlined how NYPL helps young people build science and tech skills through gaming and hands-on community activities; Jesse Sanders explained how his library offers young people digital tools that foster creative, collaborative learning; and Mega Subramaniam described school libraries as unmatched in their ability to help young people build digital skills through personalized learning opportunities.

ALA President-elect Sari Feldman, Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D-OH) embrace.

The panelists all made clear that the library’s role in preparing young people for the future extends beyond providing access to digital technologies and critical STEM information. Access is only part of the picture. At the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies, a program that simultaneously fosters literacy and scientific understanding among inner city Washington D.C. middle school students – known as Sci-Dentity – goes beyond simply presenting students with information in a textbook. The program encourages students to read science fiction books, watch science fiction movies, play interactive science games, and then write their own stories based upon their experiences. Similarly, a photography program at Brooklyn Public Library does more than provide patrons with informational resources and access to a camera – it also encourages patrons to take pictures in the community, and then present their work at a local art gallery.

The key is that in their efforts to help young people build critical skills for education and the workforce, school and public libraries don’t just provide learning opportunities, they provide connected learning opportunities. Other learning institutions may have informational resources on STEM topics; they may have a 3D printer or a CNC router. But, unlike libraries, they don’t provide environments in which young people can build skills through the use of these resources and technologies by pursuing their own personal interests.

Event participants in front of the U.S. Capitol.

What yesterday’s event made clear was that libraries help young people build a mental bridge between knowledge and passion. Libraries and librarians don’t just connect children and teens with important information. We help them understand how they can use that information to become exactly who they want to be. For libraries to continue to be youth education leaders, we must continue to help children and teens arrive at this understanding. As the ALA Washington Office ramps up its work on youth and technology, our members and staff will advocate for policies, programs, and initiatives that help libraries play this important role.

ALA thanks Venicia Gray of Rep. Fudge’s office for her hard work leading to this successful program, including a Congressional meeting room packed to capacity. Jessica McGilvray and Marijke Visser of the Washington Office orchestrated the event for ALA. The ALA Washington Office thanks YALSA for its assistance in enabling Nicola McDonald’s appearance at this program.

The post Library youth and tech leaders on the Hill: We build a bridge between knowledge and passion appeared first on District Dispatch.

Tim Ribaric: Code4Lib North 2015 St. Catharines: And so can you!

planet code4lib - Fri, 2015-06-12 20:23

Just last week I had the opportunity to co-host the Code4Lib North 2015 meetup.

read more

Roy Tennant: MARC Speaks: “When I Die”

planet code4lib - Fri, 2015-06-12 20:09

A guest column by Marc Record.

I know that some people have been all too quick to call for my death, but we must look beyond such such short-sighted little people toward the greater good, as we have always done.

In doing so, I must acknowledge that I am probably not long for this world. Not because I am not doing useful work, mind you, as I completely am, but that because there are so many who call for my demise and at some point you must realize your time is near at hand.

Thus your thoughts must betimes turn to the future, and the legacy you wish to leave to those coming after. And the legacy I wish to leave is one of description. To be specific, a description most OWL. Or Turtle. Or whatever. The point is to leave behind descriptions of useful resources that don’t require the old ways of doing things — frankly, our ways of doing things — as a requirement.

I mean, it’s all about the data. If the data that I have carried so faithfully for so many decades can be taken forward into the future, then great.

But I want you to promise me something. Back when I was born, I represented the cutting edge in technology. Sure, now I seem long in the tooth, and I am, but for many years I was a technological marvel. Most professions that relied on data (for example, doctors) were decades behind me. In a lot of ways, I was the poster child for capturing structured data controlled by rules that could be parsed by computers. It’s remarkable, really.

So that’s my ask. I will go quietly into that dark night but on one condition — that you don’t set your sights too low. That you really examine both the modern requirements for bibliographic data and the amazing opportunities that exist today.

And having reviewed all of this, you then make a bold, cutting edge, almost astonishing move. Like what happened when Henriette Avram gave birth to me.

Now that would be a legacy worthy of my name.

 

Picture by Schu, https://www.flickr.com/photos/litandmore/, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

LITA: LITA Updates, June 2015

planet code4lib - Fri, 2015-06-12 18:23

This is one of our periodic messages sent to all LITA members. This update includes information about the following:

  • Election Results
  • Learning Opportunities at Annual Conference
  • Annual Conference Highlights
  • LITA Executive Director Plans to Retire

Election Results

Please join in congratulating the newly elected LITA Board Members:

Aimee Fifarek, Vice-President/President-Elect,
Ken Varnum and Susan Sharpless Smith, Directors-at-Large for three-year terms.

Thanks go to the Nominating Committee which included Karen G. Schneider, chair, Pat Ensor, Adriene Lim, and, Chris Evjy, members.

LITA members elected to the ALA Council include: Eric Suess and Joan Weeks, Councilors-at-Large.

Congratulations to all, and, thank you to every candidate who was willing to stand for office.

Learning Opportunities at Annual Conference

Three full day workshops are being offered in San Francisco on Friday, June 26th. Two of the sessions are in the Moscone Convention Center; the third preconference is off site in a maker/hacker space. These are your choices:

  1. Creating Better Tutorials Through User-Centered Instructional Design. Hands-on workshop with experts from the University of Arizona. Moscone Convention Center 2008 (W)
  2. Learn to Teach Coding and Mentor Technology Newbies – in Your Library or Anywhere! Work with experts from the Black Girls CODE to become master technology teachers. Moscone Convention Center 2010 (W)
  3. Build a Circuit & Learn to Program an Arduino in a Silicon Valley Hackerspace. This workshop will convene at Noisebridge, 2169 Mission Street, a hacker space in San Francisco. Clearly, it will be hands on.

To register for one of these three LITA workshops simply go to the ALA Annual Conference registration and sign up. If you are already registered for conference, the workshop will be added to your registration. If you can’t attend the Annual Conference but a full day workshop on Friday, June 26th from 8:30 – 4:00 pm would be perfect for you, please go to the ALA Annual Conference registration site and sign up. Although you register for these full day workshops through the Annual Conference registration site, please note: you do not have to register for the entire conference in order to register for a workshop. Registration will be accepted on site outside the classrooms for the two workshops in the Moscone Center.

  • Register online through June 19
  • Call ALA Registration at 1-800-974-3084
  • Onsite registration will also be accepted in San Francisco.

Be sure to watch the LITA web sites for announcements about online learning opportunities that are being developed for July and August.

Annual Conference Highlights

The Open House on Friday, June 26, from 3:00 to 4:00pm, MCC-2005 (W), provides members and non-members alike an opportunity to explore with the LITA leadership the many opportunities within LITA. If there is a Committee or an Interest Group that might provide you with the leadership experience you are seeking, this is the perfect time to get some f2f advice. If you have ideas about how LITA might serve you better, this is the perfect time to share those ideas. If you are interested in programming or publications, if you are looking for people who share your interests in various aspects of technology, and/or if you are seeking a good conversation with engaged members, then you will want to attend the Open House.

“Sunday Afternoon with LITA” is scheduled for the Moscone Convention Center, 3014-3016 (W). The Afternoon starts with the popular Top Technology Trends program on June 28th from 1:00 to 2:00pm. This program features our ongoing roundtable discussion about trends and advances in library technology. The panel of experts includes: Carson Block, Andrea Davis, Grace Dunbar, Bonnie Tijerina, and Sarah Houghton, moderator.

A brief awards program at 3:00 will be followed by the LITA President’s Program. The award winners include:

  • Ed Summers, Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology,
  • David Walker, LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Outstanding Communication in Library and Information Technology,
  • Heather Terrell, LITA/Ex Libris Student Writing Award for her paper “Reference is dead, long live reference: electronic collections in the digital age.”

Following the awards ceremony, you will want to stay for Rachel Vacek’s President’s Program with Lou Rosenfeld, Rosenfeld Media, which publishes some of the best-loved books in user experience, produces UX events, and equips UX teams with coaching and training.

The Top Technology Trends program, LITA awards ceremony, and LITA President’s Program are all in the same room.

At 5:30, we transition from afternoon to evening at the LITA Happy Hour at DaDa Bar, 86 2nd Street.

LITA provides 20 programs at Annual Conference. Be sure to review the LITA Highlights page for detailed information on all LITA programs and activities planned for Annual Conference.

LITA Executive Director plans to retire

I have good news to share. After 24 years with ALA (14 of those with LITA), over 10 years with OCLC, and various other employment, I plan to retire. My last day will be July 31, 2015. I’m very excited. I’ve had a number of recommendations on what to do including: “spend the first day in your PJs”, and, “really enjoy not working”. I do plan to enjoy not working. I have a number of projects and plans I’ll be exploring, plus, people and places I hope to visit.

If you are in the San Francisco area on Sunday, June 28th, please come to the LITA Happy Hour to celebrate with me and the Membership Development Committee and other LITA leaders and members. The Happy Hour/Party is at the DaDa Bar, 86 2nd Street.

Hope to see you in San Francisco.

I encourage you to connect with LITA by:

  1. Exploring our web site.
  2. Subscribing to LITA-L email discussion list.
  3. Visiting the LITA blog and LITA Division page on ALA Connect.
  4. Connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter.
  5. Reaching out to the LITA leadership at any time.

Please note: the Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) journal is available to you and to the entire profession. ITAL features high-quality articles that undergo rigorous peer-review as well as case studies, commentary, and information about topics and trends of interest to the LITA community and beyond. Be sure to sign up for notifications when new issues are posted (March, June, September, and December).

If you have any questions or wish to discuss any of these items, please do let me know.

All the best,

Mary

Mary Taylor, Executive Director
Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)
50 E. Huron, Chicago, IL 60611
800-545-2433 x4267
312-280-4267 (direct line)
312-280-3257 (fax)
mtaylor (at) ala.org
www.lita.org

Join us in Minneapolis, November 12-15, 2015 for the LITA Forum.

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