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Ariadne Magazine: Understanding Gamification

planet code4lib - Thu, 2015-07-16 08:37

John Kirriemuir reviews the ALA Tech Report "Understanding Gamification" by Bohyun Kim, and finds a high quality introduction to the subject.

Understanding Gamification
by Bohyun Kim,
Published by American Library Association Library Technology Reports
ISBN 978-0-8389-5953-4
Price: $43.00

Need

There is a vast range of articles, reports, papers, stories and other ephemera concerning ‘gamification’, both online and in print. As an increasingly weary reader of several hundred of these items, it is obvious that there are extreme variations in the quality, bias, depth, analysis, and related and cited research within many. Though unsure of whether the world needs yet another introduction, or perhaps just needs a few high quality pieces, I reviewed this particular publication for Ariadne. Read more about Understanding Gamification

John Kirriemuir

Authors: Issue number: Article type: Date published: Thu, 07/16/2015]74http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue74/kirriemuir

Open Library Data Additions: Amazon Crawl: part fk

planet code4lib - Thu, 2015-07-16 03:00

Part fk of Amazon crawl..

This item belongs to: data/ol_data.

This item has files of the following types: Data, Data, Metadata, Text

DuraSpace News: Major Repository Networks Agree to Collaborate on Data Exchange, Technological Development, and Metadata

planet code4lib - Thu, 2015-07-16 00:00

From Kathleen Shearer, Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), CARL, ARL, RDC

DPLA: Interested in shaping “Hydra in a Box”? Take the Survey!

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 15:15

Do you manage digital collections? Are you interested in the future of repository solutions?

The Digital Public Library of America, Stanford University, and DuraSpace want to hear from you.

Take the Hydra-in-a-Box Survey: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bvCv54xcyfb5mo5

We are partnering to extend the existing Hydra project codebase and its vibrant and growing community to build, bundle, and promote a feature-rich, robust, flexible digital repository that is easy to install, configure, and maintain. This next-generation repository solution — “Hydra in a Box” — will work for institutions large and small, incorporating the capabilities and affordances to support networked resources and services in a shared, sustainable, nationwide platform. The overall intent is to develop a digital collections platform that is not just “on the web,” but “of the web.”

With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the 30-month collaborative project launched in May 2015 and is currently in the Product Design phase.  We are using the survey responses to better understand the current landscape of repository solutions in use by libraries, archives, and museums, and what these stakeholders need in an “ideal” repository solution.

Institutions of all sizes are invited to respond, including those who have digital collections not currently managed in a repository as well as those who manage multiple repositories.

Thank you in advance for your participation!

– The Hydra in a Box team

DPLA: Interested in shaping “Hydra in a Box”? Take the Survey!

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 15:15

Do you manage digital collections? Are you interested in the future of repository solutions?

The Digital Public Library of America, Stanford University, and DuraSpace want to hear from you.

Take the Hydra-in-a-Box Survey: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_bvCv54xcyfb5mo5

We are partnering to extend the existing Hydra project codebase and its vibrant and growing community to build, bundle, and promote a feature-rich, robust, flexible digital repository that is easy to install, configure, and maintain. This next-generation repository solution — “Hydra in a Box” — will work for institutions large and small, incorporating the capabilities and affordances to support networked resources and services in a shared, sustainable, nationwide platform. The overall intent is to develop a digital collections platform that is not just “on the web,” but “of the web.”

With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the 30-month collaborative project launched in May 2015 and is currently in the Product Design phase.  We are using the survey responses to better understand the current landscape of repository solutions in use by libraries, archives, and museums, and what these stakeholders need in an “ideal” repository solution.

Institutions of all sizes are invited to respond, including those who have digital collections not currently managed in a repository as well as those who manage multiple repositories.

Thank you in advance for your participation!

– The Hydra in a Box team

Code4Lib Journal: Editorial Introduction: Changes on the Editorial Board

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The publication of the 29th issue of the journal brings with it several changes to the editorial board.

Code4Lib Journal: Editorial Introduction: Changes on the Editorial Board

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The publication of the 29th issue of the journal brings with it several changes to the editorial board.

Code4Lib Journal: Implementing a Bento-Style Search in LibGuides v2

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The National University of Singapore Libraries converted their LibGuides v2 instance into a research portal and incorporated a “bento box” search interface—that is, an interface where results from multiple systems or categories are compartmentalized by system or category, like a Japanese “bento”-style lunch box—on a trial basis. Our experience shows that building and maintaining a bento box search in LibGuides requires fewer resources than a fully homegrown solution would require. This makes it an attractive platform for building a bento-style search both for libraries who have limited technical resources and libraries who might want to experiment with this kind of search before fully committing. This paper shares the design, implementation and some early usage patterns of our bento search.

Code4Lib Journal: Implementing a Bento-Style Search in LibGuides v2

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The National University of Singapore Libraries converted their LibGuides v2 instance into a research portal and incorporated a “bento box” search interface—that is, an interface where results from multiple systems or categories are compartmentalized by system or category, like a Japanese “bento”-style lunch box—on a trial basis. Our experience shows that building and maintaining a bento box search in LibGuides requires fewer resources than a fully homegrown solution would require. This makes it an attractive platform for building a bento-style search both for libraries who have limited technical resources and libraries who might want to experiment with this kind of search before fully committing. This paper shares the design, implementation and some early usage patterns of our bento search.

Code4Lib Journal: Building a Better Book in the Browser (Using Semantic Web technologies and HTML5)

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The library as place and service continues to be shaped by the legacy of the book. The book itself has evolved in recent years, with various technologies vying to become the next dominant book form. In this article, we discuss the design and development of our prototype software from Montana State University (MSU) Library for presenting books inside of web browsers. The article outlines the contextual background and technological potential for publishing traditional book content through the web using open standards. Our prototype demonstrates the application of HTML5, structured data with RDFa and Schema.org markup, linked data components using JSON-LD, and an API-driven data model. We examine how this open web model impacts discovery, reading analytics, eBook production, and machine-readability for libraries considering how to unite software development and publishing.

Code4Lib Journal: Building a Better Book in the Browser (Using Semantic Web technologies and HTML5)

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
The library as place and service continues to be shaped by the legacy of the book. The book itself has evolved in recent years, with various technologies vying to become the next dominant book form. In this article, we discuss the design and development of our prototype software from Montana State University (MSU) Library for presenting books inside of web browsers. The article outlines the contextual background and technological potential for publishing traditional book content through the web using open standards. Our prototype demonstrates the application of HTML5, structured data with RDFa and Schema.org markup, linked data components using JSON-LD, and an API-driven data model. We examine how this open web model impacts discovery, reading analytics, eBook production, and machine-readability for libraries considering how to unite software development and publishing.

Code4Lib Journal: 3D Adaptive Virtual Exhibit for the University of Denver Digital Collections

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
While the gaming industry has taken the world by storm with its three-dimensional (3D) user interfaces, current digital collection exhibits presented by museums, historical societies, and libraries are still limited to a two-dimensional (2D) interface display. Why can’t digital collections take advantage of this 3D interface advancement? The prototype discussed in this paper presents to the visitor a 3D virtual exhibit containing a set of digital objects from the University of Denver Libraries’ digital image collections, giving visitors an immersive experience when viewing the collections. In particular, the interface is adaptive to the visitor’s browsing behaviors and alters the selection and display of the objects throughout the exhibit to encourage serendipitous discovery. Social media features were also integrated to allow visitors to share items of interest and to create a sense of virtual community.

Code4Lib Journal: 3D Adaptive Virtual Exhibit for the University of Denver Digital Collections

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
While the gaming industry has taken the world by storm with its three-dimensional (3D) user interfaces, current digital collection exhibits presented by museums, historical societies, and libraries are still limited to a two-dimensional (2D) interface display. Why can’t digital collections take advantage of this 3D interface advancement? The prototype discussed in this paper presents to the visitor a 3D virtual exhibit containing a set of digital objects from the University of Denver Libraries’ digital image collections, giving visitors an immersive experience when viewing the collections. In particular, the interface is adaptive to the visitor’s browsing behaviors and alters the selection and display of the objects throughout the exhibit to encourage serendipitous discovery. Social media features were also integrated to allow visitors to share items of interest and to create a sense of virtual community.

Code4Lib Journal: Making User Rights Clear: Adding e-resource License Information in Library Systems

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
Libraries sign a wide variety of licensing agreements that specify terms of both access and use of a publisher’s electronic collections. Adding easily accessible licensing information to collections helps ensure that library users comply with these agreements. This article will describe the addition of licensing permissions to resource displays using Mondo [1] by Queen’s University and Scholars Portal (a service of the Ontario Council of University Libraries) [2] . We will give a brief introduction to Mondo and explain how we improved Mondo to add the license permissions to different library systems. The systems we used are an ILS (Voyager), an OpenURL Link Resolver (360 Link), and a Discovery System (Summon). However, libraries can use Mondo to add the license permissions to other library systems which allow user configurations.

Code4Lib Journal: Making User Rights Clear: Adding e-resource License Information in Library Systems

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
Libraries sign a wide variety of licensing agreements that specify terms of both access and use of a publisher’s electronic collections. Adding easily accessible licensing information to collections helps ensure that library users comply with these agreements. This article will describe the addition of licensing permissions to resource displays using Mondo [1] by Queen’s University and Scholars Portal (a service of the Ontario Council of University Libraries) [2] . We will give a brief introduction to Mondo and explain how we improved Mondo to add the license permissions to different library systems. The systems we used are an ILS (Voyager), an OpenURL Link Resolver (360 Link), and a Discovery System (Summon). However, libraries can use Mondo to add the license permissions to other library systems which allow user configurations.

Code4Lib Journal: Exploring Information Security and Shared Encrypted Spaces in Libraries

planet code4lib - Wed, 2015-07-15 14:39
Libraries are sensitive to the need to protect patron data, but may not take measures to protect the data of the library. However, in an increasingly collaborative online environment, the protection of data is a concern that merits attention. As a follow-up to a new patron privacy policy, the Oakland University William Beaumont Medical Library evaluated information security tools for use in day-to-day operations in an attempt to identify ways to protect private information in communication and shared storage, as well as a means to manage passwords in a collaborative team environment. This article provides an overview of encryption measures, outlines the Medical Library’s evaluation of encryption tools, and reflects on the benefits and challenges in their adoption and use.

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